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I haven't been contacted or told that this was being done. the attorney has been told that all kinds of things that aren't true. from what I understand, I'm no longer P.O.A. of finances and my sister is! No one has informed me of any of this still today..
I have taken care of my mother for almost four years with little help from siblings with pay and with Mom's full understanding that we had this arrangement. I only got paid the money I needed with the understanding that if I needed it in the future Mom would pay plus some extra to make up what I didn't need at the time.
Everything is being changed by the attorney because my sisters, without any proof of any wrong doing on my part convinced him that I was doing something wrong.
there much more detail but in a nut shell that's what is going on and it is my understanding that without knowing any of this was going on or proof, I've been made out to be the bad guy and the P.O.A. has been changed.
Mom has no idea what is going on and doesn't understand what's being done because of the dementia.
I have proof that what the attorney was told about me is full of untruths I can be prove it. I also have witnesses seeing my mom being coached on what to tell attorney on the phone and this was done for hours.

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Unfortunately, it looks like you will need to hire an attorney and possibly seek legal guardianship and/or conservatorship of your mother. All the facts will come out under oath during the hearing, and the judge will render a decision, hopefully in your favor.
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Call'Adult Protective Services. This is called undue influence to coerce change to POA for your mother. Find an excellent elder law attorney check out website Back and Super Lawyers. Make sure that the attorney is a strong litigator!
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Get yourself a good attorney. Your sister cannot legally change the POA if your mother no longer has mental faculties to agree. I went thru this with my sister and when I got an attorney, He showed her the law and said you cannot change your mother's POA. It is solid. GET AN ATTORNEY.
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This happened to me: my parents had me as their POA's, after Mom died, I was still my Dad's, but because sociopathic siblings wanted more control, and because they could not intimidate or control me, a notary (who acted illegally in my opinion) brought a new document to my Dad's home and with the help of the siblings, literally drew his name on the document. It was not his signature alone, as by that time he could not see or write legibly. My parents had chosen me as their POA because they knew I was honest and would be fair to all involved. Too bad all their children did not have the same values or they would have been the POA and my folks both knew that. I am so sorry this has happened to you; depending on how much it means to you and if you want to pursue action (which I did not because I had a nervous breakdown over it) please contact your own Elder Law attorney, your Adult Protective Services and your county social services. Be sure you have all the paper trail documentation to prove your case - that is if you choose to follow up. It is a cruel world we live in when it comes to siblings, estates, money, and who wants the power. Be prepared to be alienated if you pursue this avenue. Good ideas: get the date your Mom was originally diagnosed with dementia, that will be your most important proof. Siblings can be most hurtful and it makes me sad that you are going through what I went through 29 years ago. Bless you for caring, but be sure you're ready for what comes down the road. Your health is the most important thing. Don't stop caring for your Mom and telling her you love her every chance you get. Her care and your love for her is more important than anything else. Hugs
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What that attorney did is unethical. You can report him/her to the bar association in your state.
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It is not legal to do otherwise but the lawyer acted unethically. You can always put a document in front of someone with dementia to change a will but if he/she was already diagnosed, it can be challenged in court. A good attorney will not take on such a case without evidence that someone of advanced years is still of sound mind.
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It is legal to change POA at any time, but the issue is because of the dementia. Keep in mind that the attorney may have not been told about the dementia and may have been brought before mom at a time of relative lucidity/agreement. So there may not be any attorney ethic issue here, but he should definitely be reported to the bar to look into it. And the writer should immediately get a attorney and go to court to challenge the POA. And bring every documentation item you can. Bear in mind that unless you and your mom had an agreement in writing or some evidence of a writing that may not be validated by the court. But you need to see an attorney asap!
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Do you have a written diagnosis from the doctor that your mother has dementia? If not, then I would ask her doctor to give you a document that states that and when she was originally diagnosed.
If you have that piece of paper that shows she has dementia then what the attorney and your sisters did was unethical and illegal. I can't believe that the attorney would change POA without speaking to your mother in person.
My mother had to meet privately with her attorney to discuss POA before he would do the documentation.

I hate to see this stuff happen. It's sad.
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A competent person can change their POA for any reason or no reason. If you explain the situation to Mother and she wants to change it back to you, she can.

The real question here is whether Mom is "competent" in the legal sense. Dementia does not automatically make her incompetent. Can she understand the concept of allowing someone else to act on her behalf for financial transactions?

What the lawyer did is not unethical. A client who appeared lucid and competent asked to have a new POA designated. He did not have to check out whether the reason was valid -- he did not even have to know the reason. A competent person can change the POA on a whim, for any reason. He may have asked for a reason to get a sense of whether Mom understood what she was doing.

Your sister's ethical status could be questioned!

If Mom was competent to change the POA a few weeks ago, presumably she would be competent to change it back today (if she wants to).
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Seek your own attorney. Since this is a civil matter, it will be handled as such without police involvement. File a complaint with your local bar association against the attorney for your siblings, putting on record that he/she never contacted you to verify his/her allegations before changing the POA. This is a very serious matter with the Bar Association and they don't like their attorneys doing something that is illegal, otherwise, they could lose their license. Family disputes are never ending when it comes to inheritance, sibling rivalry and past arguments. Know that your family is not the only family that this happens to. Good luck and let us hear what happens.
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