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My husband and I have Med POA and Financial POA. We have a home visiting doctor group that sees my MIL (95 has dementia lives at home with caregiver help) about once a month. Their communication with us is really terrible. Every time they go to her home for a visit, we make arrangements to be there (we live 30 minutes away) and they either come early and leave before we get there, or knock on the door and leave because she doesn't answer. Last week my husband got a call from a guy trying to deliver an oxygen test to her home. We were not told about the test we didn't know what it was, etc. The aid that comes twice a day every day put it on her and she went to bed, took it off after 2 hours (supposed to be on overnight). We are going to call the physician office Monday. My question is since we're Med POA and she has dementia, what is their obligation to talk to us about any tests ordered or having us be there when they visit? Also is it typical for them to work this way? When we told the doctor she has to have hearing aides to hear, he said that she had no problem understanding what he was saying. He seemed surprised when we told him she needed hearing aids. I want to get rid of this doctor group, but I also was wondering how common this behavior is. We're going to tell them no tests unless they ask us first. And no appointments without us being there. At least until we find another doctor group to take over her care. Has anyone ever experienced this? By the way, her oxygen saturation is not and never has been a problem. I think they are padding their medicare billing. Which really burns me up.

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Yes JoAnn29 that is how it works apparently. But you're right, I would rather they be late and make us wait than come before we get down there. They just seem to be doing their own thing. Taking care of patients is not a particularly personal thing to them.
And MIL has beginnings of dementia at this point, and as things progress she will get more care. Her daily caregiver is so great and calls us pretty much every day. She lets us know anytime anything needs to be ramped up. Our hope is that she can stay at home. She has the income to pay for it and long term care insurance. One day at a time.
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You don’t have to say, but is this Visiting Physicians? We have used them since last summer. Not at all satisfied. Started out well with orders for a chest x-ray, blood test, oxygen test, etc. but there is only one nurse practitioner who is only available once a month. She has no personality and can be snippy. She canceled on us once and then we had to cancel because hubby had the flu. The secretary I spoke with to cancel was curt and unfriendly. A prescription refill request was messed up by them and it took 2 weeks for it to be fixed.

I am calling the home visit physician department of a large hospital in our city. And then calling VP and telling them thanks but no thanks.
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The visiting doctor in my area uses Nurse practitioners for regular visits. So, is it a doctor who is seeing her?

You need to call the office and make it clear that you must be called before a visit. You need a half hour to get there so you need a precise time. Better that they are late than you aren't there. That MIL has Dementia and hearing problems so you need to be there. If they don't do this than find someone else. I would also question the monthly visits. If its for vitals, an aide should be able to use a wrist BP meter and a Pause ox meter.

Just curious, if MIL has Dementia, why an aide only a couple of times a day?
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This sounds totally unsatisfactory. No, 'professionals' aren't all the same. We've swapped dentist and refused follow-up doctor/ specialist visit when we got the strong impression that we were being over-serviced for the money. If you want to give this lot one more chance, tell them that you intend to change unless they provide what you expect. However you have to be a bit tolerant of appointment times - sometimes earlier appointments can be longer or shorter than expected, and it throws the schedule out. Could they phone you if the timing is going to be different?
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JoAnn29 Apr 6, 2019
What I see here is that they start visitation at maybe 9 am. Some clients take a little longer than others. So they may feel it will take them till 11 before seeing Mom, but either a client wasn't home or they were done earlier. But this could be helped by a little communication. Maybe going onto another client and coming back and calling the OP telling them what was going on. Like I posted, better for the OP has to wait. I worked as a secretary for Visiting Nurses and this is pretty much how their days would go.
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