Paranoia, screaming fits and yells that someone is stealing from her. Are these behaviors of dementia?

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I honestly don't know if my mother has dementia or not. She won't see a doctor, claiming she's not 'crazy'. She's only just turning 50, but she has fits, screaming yelling stomping her foot like a 2 year old. Walks in the house and puts something down- goes outside for a few minutes comes back in yelling that someone stole the thing she put down, claiming my grandmother (her mother- who's on oxygen and can't move around well) stole and moved said object just because she can't find it. Or she can't remember things logically- claims that three adult people rode on her 2 seat motor bike over dangerous winding mt. roads with a large rottweiler puppy....this is all physically impossible and it's not even how we got that puppy. These are just a couple examples but she's gotten so bad now that she does things like this everyday to every other day. She really paranoid, say things like 'The Man'/police/government are out to get her or that she hears people around her house at 3am- she lives in sectional house in the backyard surrounded by 6ft fencing- we also have 4 dogs that wouldn't let people get anywhere near the house, much less at 3am! My grandmother can't take this kind of stress and I don't know what to do, or who to ask but typed in 'when someone forgets where they put things then yells about someone stealing it' and this site came up. Any help or just point me in a good direction so maybe I could help her and she'll stop yelling at my poor grandmother.

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Some behaviors need to be put on film.......imo
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I'm inclined to think schitzophrenia also. Sounds very much like it. My mother-in-law suffered from it, and I've dealt with a number of patients who had it. (I'm an RN) And they behaved very similarly. It's a different kind of dementia than Alzheimer's. If you can call this a bright side to having schitzophrenia versus Alzheimer's, this it it: Schitzophrenia is not a terminal illness, and can be treated, but it is life long, and is really difficult to deal with. But once on meds, and kept on them, these patients can do well, and live normal life expectancy. If I were the patient, I would prefer it over Alzheimer's. That being said, you won't know what the heck is going on with her. unless you can get her to a psych evaluation. And that is the first step for any of the potential diagnoses. I wish you luck , because that is not easy to accomplish, and usually only happen when there is some really difficult episode, that ends up needed police or ambulance. If you can't get her to a doctor, and if have to, find a reason to take her to an emergency room where the process of getting her evaluated can begin.
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I agree that your mom sounds mentally ill. Fifty is kind of old to begin manifesting symptoms for the first time but I'm sure it's not unheard of.

Get her to her Dr.
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Your mom sounds like she has a mental disorder. Rageaholic. Bipolar, Drugs. Alcoholism, Schizophrenic? Something has given her an altered state of reality. Something gives her the ok to act and think unconventionally. I wouldn't think she is in control of it at this point.
The equally important issue is that GM has conditions that are at odds with moms. You are in a tough spot. Because of her age, GM is more vulnerable. Do you all live together? Is it GM house? Is it just the three of you?
Tell us more about your mom. Does she work? Does she contribute to the household income and maintenance? Is she on disability?
Give us more information and maybe we can offer better suggestions.
With what you've said so far and by your profile I also think you should call area on aging to visit. You need help
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I have always been of the opinion that the more one can simplify the living area, lifestyle, reduced stress, the better it can be for all. But that is easier said than done. For example, the more organized the house is, inside and outside, the less objects to argue about, including pets. I mention pets because some people are allergic to them and when an aged person is left alone, it causes them stress also. Perhaps that is why there was a reference about the dog, maybe. Because it is hard to manage a sick person along with managing pets as well. Quite an overlooked issue, I think, because pets can bring joy and security, but it can be just another thing that affects caregivers' abilities to handle the stress of an ailing parent while also just trying to take care of pets. But, of course, there are many other things to argue about, like you said, that create paranoia. It's hard to always put the right synonym to it. Lack of sleep for all impacts the household as well as the parent-child relationship worrying about that they are not doing a good enough job handling their parents' health issues. I think there must be some truth or reality to transference that all people including the pets are impacted by. Certainly bullet point all the things that may be increasing problems, including inability to cope with every single problem. It's hard and there is no manual, just perseverance in making things easier. Seek more solutions. Glad you shared!
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Very odd behavior for a 50 year old. Has she ever been diagnosed as schizophrenic ? I would definitely try to get her seen by a physician.
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This is not a good environment for grandma. Is grandma competent? When did mom last see a doc, she needs to.

Call Adult Protective Services for help for grandma. Or maybe a social worker, geriatric care manager could help improve the situation.
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