I never know what kind of a day it's going to be, good day or bad day. Does this happen to everyone? - AgingCare.com

I never know what kind of a day it's going to be, good day or bad day. Does this happen to everyone?

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My mother (93) is good one day. Showers, gets dressed ( with help) is awake. Next day stays in nightgown and robe and sleeps a good part of the day.

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Churchmouse, what is ironing? Is it some kind of electronic game? I think I'd rather read a book. :-)
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My mom lives in a nursing home. She has dementia and is 81 years old. I will visit about four times a week. Today was a good day. We chatted, I stayed with her while she got her hair done, and we listened to her Frank Sinatra music(her absolute favorite artist) Tomorrow I can go in her room and she can be crying and just laying in bed. I think it sounds cliché , but try to take every day as it comes. One day at a time . Each day brings new hope and new sorrow also. Try to enjoy the good ones, and take care of yourself during the bad ones. I really think this is normal. With age, medication, sometimes depression, weather, etc. Take care hugs and prayers
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I don't know about everyone, but it did to us too. It stands to reason, though - limited reserves of energy, and if one day you're skipping about then the next you're going to need to recharge. As long as it doesn't unduly trouble your mother, I should try not to let it worry you either - enjoy the lively days, and get the ironing done on the quiet ones :)
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It happens to me and I'm only in my 50's .... ;)
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Every time i went in to see my mom i never knew what state she would be in. I said "Mom's like a box of chocolates, I never know what I am going to get"
and it varied by the hour!
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My husband had good days and bad days with his dementia. Sometimes good hours and bad hours! It is the nature of the disease, I'm afraid.

My mother in the nursing home had pretty consistently good days -- UNLESS she had a cold or a sore somewhere or any physical discomfort.

I'm in my 70s. I have major depressive disorder. It is mostly managed very well, but I, too, have "bad days." I try just to be gentle with myself on those days and remind myself that this won't last forever. Tomorrow will be a better day!

As others have said, take advantage of the good days!
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LOL. I noticed no one has liked CM's answer yet, even though it is a very good answer. They probably got to the ironing part and scrolled on down. Ironing is worse than digging ditches.
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My mother died of Alzheimers 13 weeks ago. At home. We had at home hospice. By then I defined a good day as one where she woke up and gave me a smiles and kisses (as best she could) and let us get the hand brace on.

I miss her so much.
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We used to have a mix of good and bad. I could usually predict them. Mom loved Sundays. We would go to church and out to eat. She was upbeat. Then Monday would be just the opposite. I guess Sundays wore her out.

Lately all days have not been good. She hasn't wanted to go to church for three weeks now. She asks that I go to the restaurant and get the food to bring home. She never wants to do things now. Little things can change very quickly when it comes to old age. She is 90 with back problems and dementia, so life is painful and perplexing to her.
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Oh I loved the part about ironing! I still iron and find it relaxing. When I was a teen my dad allowed me to iron his Navy clothes. I was so proud to do it precisely how the Officers were required to be so starched and pressed. Thank you for helping me remember that. Also, my mom does similar things like not getting dressed some days. I do t question it.
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