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He had no restrictions getting in and out of bed. Now he is at hospital getting stitches and MRI.

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princess1148, a person can just as easily fall, let's say at your home, even if you were in the same room. Elders can tumble at a blink of an eye.

What caused Dad to fall, that is what everyone needs to find out. Does Dad use a cane or a walker? If no walker, time to purchase a rolling walker which is easier to use then a regular walker. It won't eliminate the falls but should limit them.

I remember a writer on the forum say that her love one was in a room which had a doctor, nurses and some aides, and her love one found a way to fall.
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Since he had no restrictions he obviously wasn't flagged as a fall risk. Did he have a history of falls that wasn't taken into consideration?
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Sometimes falls happen. Someone assigned to your dad 24/7 couldn’t keep all falls from happening. I hope your dad’s OK.
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Sorry but staff cannot be there 24/7. There are other residents that need care. Care facilities are not allowed to use restraints. Mats can be put on each side of the bed and bed lowered so they don't get hurt if they fail, out. Is Dad suppose to use a walker and doesn't. Staff can remind him to use it but Can't make him.
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My mom fell with TWO aides in the room and broke her hip. When I expressed frustration about this to the discharge RN at the hospital she said to me "MY mom fell with three RNs in the room and one of them was ME!"

She went on to explain that sometimes the break causes the fall and not the other way around.

As FF mentions, try to find out what caused the fall, and address that. But falls happen.
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Old people fall. It happens. As people get older, they often engage in less physical activity, which causes them to lose muscle mass and bone both of which can make them lose their balance. They may be taking medications that can cause dizziness. Their eyesight may be going.
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Princess1148,
Wouldn't it be great if there was a 1:1 ratio so everyone could have the attention they need? But, sadly, the reverse is often true, too many patients for one caregiver.

As freqflyer said, the elderly can fall for a variety of reasons, confusion, tripping, in a hurry to the bathroom, in the dark, a bone breaks causing a fall, etc.
Accidents happen. It's no one's fault.

It would help to know why he fell so measures could be taken to rectify the situation.

Since they can fall with you 2 ft. away from them, I don't see how anyone could be blamed, especially if he had no walking restrictions.
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I am an expert at falling, have been doing it for many years, off a horse, pulled over in the snow flat on my face in the Salvation Army and face down on the pavement. My latest and greatest was breaking my hip a year ago. Picking up an interesting looking stick on the side of the road. got back to the car and down I went. A passing motorist helped me up and I managed to get back in the car and drove to town, drove past the mail box then had a package to send but decided against getting out of the car in town so drove home. Managed to get out of the car and up two steps into the kitchen and sat on a chair and YELLED for Hubby. The EMTs carried me out on that chair to the ambulance. never used to break anything but now I am one of the elderly I hardly move without a walker.
Hubby also falls a lot and I constantly tell him to use a walker but does he listen oh NO.
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Veronica, that is funny! I hope you at least still have the interesting stick.

Princess, so sorry about your dad. I hope he is feeling better soon.
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“The three primary risk factors for falling are poor balance, taking more than four prescription medications, and muscle weakness.”

From Being Mortal
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Princess it is a very sad fact but true no less as We age We loose muscle mass and We loose Our strength and balance too. I would not go down that road of blaming the Nursing Home Staff simply because They can not watch all of Their Patients all of the time. Veronica 91 tells Us how it is and what We can expect when We grow into old age. It is best to accept Your Dads fall and go with it. You can be certain the Nursing Home will have Your Dad on 24 hour watch from now on, and assist Him when He needs to go to the bathroom. Old age is like like a thief in the night, it creeps up on Us way too quickly, but then it is only the Blessed Who Live long enough to become old, as far too many People die young.
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Elderly persons are more prone to falling, that's for sure. It does not matter if there are 3 aides in the room, a physician, and a nurse. It can still happen due to the physical changes associated with aging, such as poor balance, medication use, decreased proprioception, declining vision, etc.
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Yes they lower the bed but a person with ALZ will still manage to fall without restraints and since the facility can say they have a non restraint policy (even with the surgeon saying he needs restraints) you will end up paying for a "sitter" who will notify the staff if the person is attempting to get up. Crazy situations and very costly. I have yet to have a response from letters members of Congress on this situation.
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My dad is a fall risk at his ALF. The beds are lower and a fall mat is by his bed. The bed is against one wall so only one way to fall. He sits/sleeps with a pad alarm. He was relocated to a room closer to the nurses station due to the falls. He has been in a wheelchair since last spring when the falls started.
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Find a place where they have enough help that he will be watched over. Maybe put in the dayroom, if that is ok with him. I know how you feel, my mother fell in the home and I had just walked in the door. When I heard her, yelling from the back room, I asked a girl who worked there to check on her but she was on the phone, laughing, talking to a fried. I ran back there and she was lying on the floor, another lady came running and helped her up. Very sad.
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My dad is a fall risk but refuses to use any mobility aid. The staff were very concerned about what I would do if he got hurt in a fall. I told them, falls happen, if he refuses to use anything to help him then he knows he is taking a chance and could end very tragic as he takes blood thinners with a therapeutic level of 2.5-3.5, so you call 911 and then me. However, if you push him we will have problems. We all laughed, knowing a caregiver would not push a resident over. Some people only learn by pain and my dad is one of them, well maybe, he also thinks if he doesn't look it's not there, so sometimes it hurts and he doesn't learn. You have to believe that the care home is doing the very best they can for your dad, if you don't it may be time to look for a new location for him. Our parents are old and things happen so please do not look to blame every time something happens, you will wear yourself out and be miserable. I tell people I have a 300# toddler, cuz mostly that's how it is. The only difference is I can't give him timeout for anything.

Please come back and let us know how your dad is, you can be assured that many are pulling, praying, hopeful for both of you in this trial and we would like to know if you are both okay. 🤗
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Yes, there are many reasons for falling, and I've been there too.After falling off a ladder and breaking my wrist, I realized that I am now breakable. Gave up skiing, snowshoeing, riding bicycle or motorcycle. Ice will still do it, even when I am careful. So will trying to teach a puppy to leash walk, when the pup is strong enough to pull a sled! 2 face plants in snow. Last week I stpped of the porch into a foot of new powder snow, forgetting the ice underneath. Another face plant, right in front of my husband. My aunt is thriving with us, but has fallen twice in the room with me, and once with caregiver helping her. It happens. We do what we can to prevent. (Aunt now uses a walker, and I will hire someone to train the dog to leash-walk. Other training with him is going well. Good luck.
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It sounds so simple, yet it's some of the wisest knowledge I've been given: "Old people fall, that's what they do." It was a respected Geriatrician who told me that.
1) There could be a dozen people in the room and someone can still fall.
2) Restraints are not allowed for good reason. Wouldn't you rather have a life where you are at risk of falling rather than a life where you are retrained to a bed or chair? I would rather die falling than live immobilized and controlled.
I hope your Dad is OK. Also, talk to his doctor about why he fell. Is he on any drugs that could have contributed? If so, take him off of them. The more he moves around the less risk he is for falling. Better balance, better strength, etc...
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My 65 yo friend fell in her walk in closet CHANGING HER SHOES...broke her femur--resulting in one nasty surgery to repair and she will be months before she's walking w/o a cane, if she ever does. Her hubby was less than 10 feet from her.

I do have to add that she is a very large woman, lost a lot of weight in recent years, but was well over 300 lbs for MANY years. That. no doubt took it's toll.

Mother falls all the time. More of a slumping to the ground, but, still. She has people within shouting distance at all times AND a fall pendant. It's when shse tries to navigate w/o her walker that we have problems.

I fall, too. Misjudge steps, climb on unsteady ladders or chairs--I forget I am not the little mountain goat I once was. Aging is hard!!
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Princess, I have this problem with my 94 yr old mother. The staff have found her after a fall within minutes because they have doors open and are looking in each room as they pass constantly. I signed permission for them to have an alarm put on to notify them if Mom is attempting to get up either from her bed or her lift chair. A wonderful helpful device. It still doesn't prevent a fall but sets off a loud notice that "Mary is on the move again." She's slow so it has helped the staff and they thanked me for allowing the device to be used. We now use it when she is in her wheelchair. She forgets her legs give out. Mom has turned into quite the escape artist. Dementia is the gift that keeps on giving unfortunately. I feel it is our job, as family, to help the staff help our loved one. Blame is just a waste of time. Solutions come from working together to make a situation more tolerable. Not all problems are the fault of the staff and you will find that they appreciate problem solving. Of course there are situations where concern is needed and we all need to we watchful, but the majority of staff are caring and dedicated. Good luck and try to stay positive.
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Our Papa's first hip broke causing him to fall. Fast forward eight years and even though he was on a walker he started falling occasionally so the facility g o t with me and we started him in a wheelchair. He had dementia and was not on meds - physically healthy as a horse at age 90. Also still strong in his legs and arms plus perfect eyesight. On New Year's Day, 2014, we were with him eating lunch at the facility when he got up and fell before I could get out of my chair. Other hip broke. No matter the precautions, it is not possible to keep someone from falling unless they are confined to bed. We did all we could do and the facility did the same. Take all precautions then pray and hope for the best. So sorry about your Dad and hope he will be alright. Hugs.
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My mom has fallen probably 2 dozen times - none as exciting as Veronica- but broken back, shoulder, wrist, ankle and has hit her head so many times it's a wonder she's still here

Some of these falls occurred within two feet of me

I somewhat felt a bit of relief when after one of mom's last falls she parked herself in a wheelchair and scooted about with her feet

Of course this relief was short lived as aides then dropped her a few times while transferring her

Now that she's immobile she asks them not to let her fall when she's suspended in the hoyer lift
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I also fell in my own closet..LOL.. and broke my ankle stepping onto our deck last year. Dad was in MC and fell in the main room just standing up, while plenty of aides were there.. not their fault, he was a fast riser. It just happened with age. My aunt currently has a broken wrist from trying to catch my mom when she fell,, mom fine,, Aunt in a cast. Mom is so tippy, but also won't use any aides like cane or walker,, those are for old people ( she is 87)
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Princess,

My Mom was inches away from me. I turned my back to do something. She fell, grabbed me around the waist and took me down with her. This was when she was still living in her home.

When she was placed in a nursing Home her falls continued. Bed alarms, chair alarms, nothing worked to prevent the falls.  Mom for a while would turn the alarms off. Sigh...

The facility did replace her bed with one that was a few inches high. That helped.

I confess I fell a couple weeks ago...hard. I was afraid to even try to move. I will spare you the details but I was doing something I had no business doing. Luckily I was not hurt. Just very sore for a few days.

Even with eyes on your Dad 24/7 if your Dad is prone to falls unfortunately it is going to happen.
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princess1148: Yes, any health issue can and does happen at a nursing home. My late mother actually suffered a stroke at one. That, in no way, is meant to  alarm you, though it did happen.
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