Mom is too confused to understand that she can't get up and walk without risking a devastating fall. How to keep her from doing this? - AgingCare.com

Mom is too confused to understand that she can't get up and walk without risking a devastating fall. How to keep her from doing this?

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As part of a rather long dying process, my mother has recently slipped into a dementia- like state. She is extremely weak and can't stand or walk without risking a fall. We don't want her to spend what's left of her life in pain from a broken hip or something similar, but she doesn't understand that she can't just get up and walk. My dad is her caregiver, and all it takes is a moment of inattention and she's up trying to do something. She fell yesterday and bruised her hip badly but did not break it. She is beyond being capable of understanding the consequences of her actions and my dad does not yet want to put her into an assisted care facility. Anyone know of a way to handle this so that she can stay in the house with my dad while not risking a dangerous fall?

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Hospice could be required.
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Just received word from my dad that the hospice folks got him something that will let him know if she gets up out of bed. I don't know anything more than that yet, but it sounds like it might be a solution. Again, thanks to all of you for your help!
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I'm going to check these out. It would be a good way to monitor activity in my father's house. Thanks for the info, CM.

Thinking about it, there probably are systems like this in high security areas.
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The manager suggested them when I was tearing my hair out to her about mother's refusal to call for help with standing and walking around. They detect anyone moving around in the room and trigger the key worker's pager or the nursing station - same as chair and bed pads, I suppose. During the day there were plenty of people keeping an eye on her; but it was a good way to keep tabs without going into her room and disturbing her at night.
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CM, so the sensors would pick up any movement in the room, whether it was your mother or a visitor? Were they like security systems that rich folks have which monitor gates and outside areas, etc.? Or were they alarms that flashed silently or sounded an alert?

I actually like that idea because it would be a clue as to when someone was there. I've been thinking more and more about this for Dad in his home.

Thanks for the helpful information.
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GA, the facility my mother stayed at for respite care had in-room motion sensors; I don't know about cameras because I didn't ask but they might have been integrated in the same system. And, true to form for this place, they asked mother's permission (to be polite - they asked mine too!) to switch them on and connect them to the nursing station. So that's how it's done; but whether or not it's standard practice..?
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The comments here have made me wonder how advanced technology is or could be used to create monitoring systems for elders in their own homes. I believe that security companies do have options for internal monitoring, linked to remote apps that could be run on SmartPhones, but I haven't paid much attention to them primarily b/c of the price of SmartPhones and up until recently I haven't really had the need to pay extra just for what they offer.

I'm wondering though if anyone has anything like this? Any security systems that you're using that provide not only remote monitoring but visuals and alarms in the event someone gets up and/or falls?

Has anyone discussed this with security companies? Reminds me, I have a relative who's in that business and should be asking him what's available.
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My mother was bed-ridden for a few months a couple of years ago...it was wearing me out having to run down the hall & check on her constantly...my husband suggested a security camera which works great...we were able to keep a monitor in the livingroom so we could glance at it periodically to keep an eye on her...we still have the camera, even though she is mobile again...this allows us to see if she is resting or up & about ( she has a tendency to wander)...by the way, I forgot to mention that these security cameras have two-way microphones, so in the event that my mom starts doing something where she may get injured, we can stop her...it's quicker than sprinting down the hallway hoping to get there in time.
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Years ago when my father-in-law was in rehab he used to fall when he got out of bed so the rehab center put a padded mat on the side of his bed to cushion any potential fall. As many people have pointed out restraint or bed rails were not allowed. They used to be allowed when my mom, a dementia patient was in the hospital after a TIA. Although she couldn't remember many things--even using a call button--she always figured out how to climb out of bed by going to the foot of the bed where there were no rails. Eventually, when she was in assisted living in a dementia unit, a geri chair worked to keep her safely in place.
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Thanks so much for all of the ideas, everyone. They're much appreciated. I'll pass them along to my dad. A couple of quick things: She's under hospice care but still at home. She's been in physical decline for some time now, but the mental issues are new. And yeah, it's really hard on my dad. I live (almost exactly) 1000 miles away but my sister is close and helps him out some. Still, it's mostly on his shoulders.
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