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My mom is 92 with later stages of dementia and pretty healthy. My mom is taking neudexta, trazadone, and Aricept. She has had UTIs in the past and I have been taking her to the hospital for IVs and that seemed to help.
I just don't know if this behavior with wanting to be in bed is the dementia progressing or something medical and can someone have a good BP and O2 and still have something wrong with her heart.

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It's been my experience that when the elderly slow down -- both mentally and physically -- they SLOW DOWN. Their whole physiology slows down, which is a prologue to dying. Things tire them out more quickly, crises take a bigger toll on them emotionally and physically, and what we see as small exertions are huge for them. Be patient, it's all part of the stages of life. One of the major indicators is sleeping a lot more as well. Appetites dwindle, talking decreases, and things kinds of 'go out' like a candle burning down. It is indeed hard to watch, because we're witnessing them 'leaving' us little by little. But God is waiting for them on the other side.
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So glad the hear that sleeping a lot and doing nothing seems to be the norm for dementia patients. Mom seems perfectly content to sit on the couch all day dozing, watching tv or just staring out into space. She still has a good appetite and I always take that as a good sign but gave up long ago trying to interest her in any type of activity. I guess it's the normal progression for dementia (and getting older).
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One factor with my own parents was that they were often dehydrated which made them listless. They don;t eat or drink enough to have much energy. I found that setting a tall glass of sweetened iced tea next to my Mom's char had quite an impact. She would sip at it and really revive. Once she had taken in more liquid I could usually get her to eat a snack like a mozzarella cheese stick with some Ritz crackers, etc. It all seemed to help.
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This sounds like normal aging to me. My MIL (who's lived with us for the past 10 months) has slowed down consdierably since she came here. And mentally, she's declined from about a 5 year old to a 2 year old, in terms of her ability to understand/follow conversations, remember things, and make decisions. Last month she started sleeping 18 hours out of 24, getting up just to eat and straighten herself out a bit. Then she rallied for a couple of weeks, getting back to a schedule where she was awake for 10 hours a day or so. Now she's back to sleeping 18-19 hours of 24. This is to be expected!

What's the surprise? No one lives forever! Having had well over a dozen pets (cats and dogs) over the last 30 years, I can tell you that one of the greatest lessons they teach us is how the lifespan works. As living creatures age, they slow down. My MIL now sleeps and eats like my very elderly dogs and my now 17 year old cat did/do.

I don't understand why anyone would do anything other than keep the person comfortable and cared for, i.e., eating well, bathed, taking their medications as scheduled, etc. My MIL has some skin tumors that are likely cancerous. She's had a number of these removed in the last 10 years. Are we going to have her treated at this point for some others? NO!!!! The general anesthesia she had to remove the others - sometimes as often as 3 x/year - NO DOUBT contributed to her current acelerating dementia (yes there are studies that have found such a link - especially in women and people who have general anesthesia/surgery after 55). We won't allow her to be operated on with the likelihood that she will either not wake up or - far worse - wake up and not know ANYthing or ANYone (including herself). And she's much more likely to slow down to the point of "stopping" - due to metabolism and vascular issues - than to die of cancer anyway.
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My mother is much the same way. She is 88 with some type of dementia. Her vitals are good, but she doesn't want to do anything but watch TV. Today she stayed on the couch all day -- something new for her. She had woke up very cross this morning and I think it was her way of withdrawing. At 92, that your mother doesn't want to be active isn't surprising. I wish it weren't so, but changing it takes constant nagging. My mother will get up early on Sunday. She likes going to church, so she gets up an eager beaver. That is always good to see. She is comfortable going to church.
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This is a natural progression of dementia. They lose their interest in doing what we consider "normal'. Past 85 they are tired and don't have much energy. Leave her alone and stop trying to reverse the normal progression of life. Give her some vitamin D and multiple vitamins that may help. I am going through the same thing with my mother. I had to realize that all the effort we put forth is not helping their normal progression in life. Be patient and understanding. God will not take her until he is ready. Accept the fact that she has lived a long and good life.
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We all have a life cycle. Watch their eating and sleeping habits. If they start eating less and sleeping more may be at the end of their life cycle. Everyone is different. Start asking the PCP about the differences they will tell you and be more specific. Remember we were a;; born to die. We just don't know where, when or how it will happen. Have your business in order so when it's your turn you will not be a burden on those who love you. Be prepared!!

I am a retired banker and watched the turmoil of families who would come in without a clue of their loved ones wishes. It was not all elderly. Get a POA and healthcare directive prepared for yourself as soon as possible. Consult with an attorney.

We all love our mothers and fathers who are elderly. Start making them as comfortable as possible and leave the rest to the professionals and God.
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My dad is 91yrs old...he sleeps a lot, eats and watches tv. Why wouldn't this be normal for most people that old??
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My Father who is 90 only wants to eat, sleep and watch TV. Seems happy because I tried to get him to do other things and he just becomes nasty.
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love my beautiful once, very active mom...she too is just dwindling into a frail, vulnerable, childlike adult. I keep her clean, fed, and let her sleep...I feel blessed when she's sleeping...she always looks very peaceful. She really can't do anything anymore...so it is a blessing to me!
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