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Mom, 84 has developed laryngitis that lasts weeks even before moving to AL. We’ve joking referred to it as “selective speech” because it can come and go during conversation or go on for days. Her Drs do not offer anything new to try but I am convinced this is real because she’s developed a dry cough as well. Any ideas? Is it possible a legionaries type air contamination?

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Not with the cough , so much, unless his voice is irritated a lot, but with the gravelly froggy scratchy voice, here is what happened to my bro when he went to assisted living. He got this from talking too much, hee hee. I am serious. Now he says it happens if he talks on phone, then talks too much to others. Air is warm and dry in his area and they sit out more than not, and that also contributes. He says he is getting "weak little old man's voice" from talking much more than he is used to. Is learning to nod a bit more. Not sure if this is the case where you are, but it is a thought.
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AT1234 Aug 2019
Isn’t that funny, that’s what I’ve been told by other residents and medtechs! That she talks on the phone constantly, too. Wow lol
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Update: the dr stoped second BP med and apparently nothing has changed, her blood pressures are good but vocal cords and larengytus still comes and goes. Sometimes for mist of the day then dry coughing at night.
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It could be an allergy.

Did she move from one city to another? My dad gets sick everytime he goes on a road trip. If not treated, he gets pneumonia. So frustrating that he keeps on traveling and round and round it goes.

Just read all posts, dry air should be dealt with 1st. I bought a humidifier that has a filter ball so I can use just tap water which makes it easier to keep running. Auto shut off and 48 hour run time. They have come a long way.

I would check allergies also. New laundry products, cleaning supplies or perfume could cause these symptoms.

Let us know how it sorts out.
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AlvaDeer Aug 2019
really good thought.
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GERD is something that causes a person to constantly clear the throat which causes coughing and larngytitis sometimes. My 92 year old mother is constantly dry coughing, throat clearing and overeating, causing GERD and needing meds and chewing TUMS. This especially happens after she consumes copious amounts of ice cream. She's also on night oxygen with a humidifier which doesn't help the situation either.
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More on original post: My mother moved from a very humid area to ours that’s very dry four years ago. The more I’m reading responses the more I think that really could be the key to this. Her Blood pressure med will be replaced and I’m sure that will help but a humidifier will probably help too. Thank you all for your responses, I’ll update.
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A humidifier might help, A/C or heat is very drying. If I travel out west in my motor home, I always bring one with me or I get sick, flares up my bronchitis.
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I agree with the BP med. My Mom always had a cough drop in her mouth after a change in her meds. When they went to another one, the cough stopped.

Gas heat is a dry heat. We have a humidifier on our heating unit to help with this. Check the filter in her heating/ac unit if in her room. May need changing.
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Another possibility is dry air, notoriously present in many buildings, including offices, although I think it's drier in care facilities b/c the heat  always seemed to be higher.

There were times before I got used to "medical air" when I would lose energy just trying to stay hydrated; I headed for the fountain as soon as I reached my destination.  Locating fountains in hospitals and care facilities was a priority!

Buy a reasonably priced hygrometer, which shows temperature and relative humidity.   The latter will vary by location, and in  a home will vary by season as well as furnace temp settings.   

When the humidity gets below, say 35, I find it too dry for me.    It wouldn't surprise me if the humidity in a care facility is down around 15 or 20.

If this is the issue, buy a good humidifier; you can get them at Lowes or HD.   Water would have to be added on a regular basis, so that could be an issue.   But if the care staff is good, you might be able to have someone arrange to do that on a regular basis.

(Given the pace of tech progress, there may be humidifiers that have greater moisture capacity, or don't have to be filled regularly.)

Plants can also humidify air:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/hpgen/houseplants-that-increase-humidity.htm provides some insight on this benefit. 

(If the URL is deleted, do a search on "plants which humidify air.")

There are also natural stone room air humidifiers, but I don't know how well they work.

Good luck, and please let us know if you find the cause is in fact low humidity.
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Asthma or COPD? Has this been ruled out?

The dry cough is my first asthma response, losing my voice is my second (don't get the tight chest).

I can get this with cold air, humid air & very offen in cold air-conditioned places (yeah my lungs are super fussy).

I'd be wanting that air conditioning checked for legionairies for peace of mind maybe too.

Another thought: my DH used to be always losing his voice - sometimes had reflux which seemed to be a factor. He was told there is a silent reflux that can cause cough & hoarness.
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There's a blood pressure medication that commonly causes dry cough, lisinopril (and related ACE inhibitors). Is she by any chance taking an ACE inhibitor med? The side effect can develop even after you've been on the medication for a long time.
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AT1234 Jul 2019
She is on that, and her Accolade nurse said the dr needs to change it. He’s coming next week. Another thing I’m not crazy about with a facility primary care. The BP med needs to be replaced not just stopped.
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Has she seen an ENT specialist to rule out a mechanical problem? Certain medications can cause A cough. Also a certain lung disease that can be found on an X ray
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AT1234 Jul 2019
Yes saw one this week, he said well this seems to be the same thing that you had 2 years ago. No I’m not kidding.
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You say that this started BEFORE she moved to AL.

Has she had a chest xray? Did she have a TB test before moving into AL?
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AT1234 Jul 2019
Yes, she had it at her house before AL. Yes, she had a TB test, was negative.
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