Can grandchildren have POA over children?

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Aunts controlling grandma because they have POA. My grandmother has recently been having episodes of not remembering where she lives and being really irritable. These episodes last all but 10 minutes then she is fine. My grandfather passed 10 years ago of cancer and the only times my grandmother has these episodes is when the anniversary of his death approaches. Which happened to be 3 weeks ago. My two horrible aunts now based on two freak out episodes have self declared her "crazy"! My younger sister lives with her and has been for the last 3 years. My aunt wants to force her out of her room keep in mind there are other rooms in the home she could move into but she wants hers. Her reasoning is she has power of attorney over my grandmother and can legally kick her out of her room. And if my sister refused both my aunts have threatened to have her ordered mentally incompetent and put her in a nursing home. Can they do this? My grandmother aside from her "2" episodes is perfectly fine she can cook clean maintain her garden. Knows all her grandkids. My aunts are jealous because my grandmother favors her grandkids but we have always been there for her and aren't interested in her money or home we just want what is best for her! Is it wise to go behind their backs and seek legal advice and take her to the doctor ourselves and see what they have to say? Can my grandmother appoint one of her grandchildren her power of attorney? I love my grandmother her money means nothing! Please help!

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Just to reiterate what Jeanne wrote, a person can choose any heir he or she wants, and similarly can specifically disinherit any family member or relative.

Where the familial relationship comes into play legally is if the person dies intestate. Then state law holds, and specifies the family relations which are considered to be heirs.
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Yes, take it GM for a good check up. If found to be of sound mind, yes she can revoke her POA and assign a new one. Hopefully she hasn't made it Aunts executors. If so, she can change that. If the doctor finds her sound, have him write a report to have for the lawyer that will be transfering the POA. Your grandmother can appoint the lawyer POA. That way no family member is involved and he will be able to reinforce it better by asking your GM what her wishes are.
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From what I 've read so far, this is a dysfunctional family. It seems to me that the GM trusts the gchildren more and I can see why. Maybe the GD lives with her for company or because there r problems in her family. The thing here is that a child has no right to move into a parents home If the parent doesn't want them there and this is what is happening. Seems to me the Aunts are bullies. Someone needs to stand up for this woman before anyone sets up residency then it will be hard to get them out. I have no idea how this an be done. Maybe try Office of the aging and see what resources they have or can point her in the right direction.
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Jeannegibbs, did you my post in a hurry? "Unless GMA specifically spelled out a gift amount in the will". And you're right, no one has the right to look at the will if she doesn't want them too. Exactly my point, I've never heard of a grandchild requesting that. No idea why the other one is living in the spare room either, so guess that's all 3 things we're on the exact same page about. :-) Really weird you'd mention old records, my last remaining GMA is really ill, last night I was just dreaming about being in her old house, and her old record player was playing.
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New2this, GMA can leave her estate, whatever it is, to whomever she pleases. It can be her three children or her grandchildren or a luxury hotel for orphaned cats. She is not required to leave her things to her "heirs" or even to family. And she is also not required to let anyone look at the will if she doesn't want to. No one has a right to insist on this.

I have no idea why one granddaughter is living in the spare room, or why a daughter thinks she should be. But there is nothing inherently wrong with either or both of them being there IF IT IS WHAT GMA WANTS.

I no I sound like an old-fashioned broken record (anyone remember those?), but if GMA is still competent, SHE is in charge of making decisions, and one decision she could make and easily execute is to make someone else POA.
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Guess I don't understand. If GMA can "cook, clean, maintain her garden", why would anyone be living in a spare room at her house? It's sure not GMA's responsibility to provide housing to anyone at her age, (especially a Grandchild), sounds like she already raised her children. I sure won't be, nor would I want any drama in my otherwise happy home, messing the general flow of my day when I get to that age. As far as you wanting to see her will, yikes. I hate to tell you this but if she has 3 children, (they are her true heirs), you have at least one Sis, you are 4th, or 5th in line as far as any say, or any $. In this type of situation, Grandchildren usually don't get anything. Unless GMA is loaded and spelled out a specific gift amount in her will and it is actually left over at the end of the day, after many expenses that are yet to come, hopefully for many years. You and your siblings, (and cousins), will all be in position to inherit from YOUR OWN parent, someday, a Grandparent owes you nothing. If you really think there is emotional abuse happening and you want to help, all I can think of is to talk to your Father and GMA together about filing a report with APS regarding the Aunts, and take it from there. Keep bugging Dad to stand up for her, he's probably her best shot and will be taken more seriously than Grandkids, especially ones who are living in her spare room...
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My number one question is: does your grandmom want a new person to be her POA, if she does, go get a new one drawn up and notorized. Yes a grandchild can be a POA over a child. Who doesn't want the aunt to move into grandmoms house. The only one who has the authority to say yes or no is grandmom who also has the right to tell your sister to move to another room if she chooses. This is all pending upon the fact that grandmom is competent. You can have any papers signed and motorized that you want. It will be your aunts burden to prove in court that she was not competent when she signed the new documents. A very frank discussion with geandmom is in order. Good luck. P.s. Your aunt sounds like a bully.
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Why kick out the sister? Maybe she helps the GM. Your Dad needs to get involved. Your Aunt is way out of line. She needs to be made aware of what a POA entitles her to. Not sure what can be done about her trying to move in when her Mother doesn't want it. Ur sister should not give up her room. Actually, I think she should stay there becauseif Aunts verbably abuse GM it could get worse. But again, Dad has to get involved.
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CM, I'm laughing and chuckling as I read your comments, especially about the delays in answering phones!

I think you're right that American's wouldn't tolerate the OPG's powers. I myself would be uncomfortable, especially since over the years I've lost confidence in the government's problem solving abilities.

Given that some folks in certain areas of the US don't even want the Federal government to "meddle" in their lives, I think there would be some really strong resistance to federal involvement in medical and financial caregiving proxy issues.
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GA, you've reminded me of the one time I did ring the OPG with a query - I don't remember the details but I do remember the lady's closing advice which was "you just have to use your common sense, really…" Talk about a hostage to fortune!

I don't think Americans would put up with the OPG's extensive powers, not for a moment. They're not often used - you have to be seriously incompetent or actually criminal - but if you make a real hash of POA (and it comes to their attention, which is a-whole-nother story) they can boot you out and take over. And charge for it. But they're even slower to act than they are to answer the dam' phone (tap tap tap snore...)
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