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My father is 71 had a stroke about 4 months ago. He now has very bad vision and can't concentrate on anything. I am 29 and work all day and so doors his wife. He is left in the house alone from early in the morning till evening. I stop by briefly, and suggest things for entertainment but he does nothing but watch the news all day long. He can't read or do puzzles, he can't drive, he tries to go for but walks but we live in south Florida and it's hotter than Hades out. He "hates" people and doesn't want friends or to go to a senior center for the day. I really don't know what to do for him anymore. He wants me to sit with him in his house forever, but I can't, I'm a married woman with a small business and life of my own. I have no siblings to help me. I'm really starting to get annoyed and depressed because I guess I'm feeling overwhelmed. He's like a child. It's very limited what he can do or will do, so that's why I'm looking for suggestions... Maybe something I haven't thought of. Thanks.

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You said he has a wife? I know you care but he is her responsibility. You can be there for her but you have your own responsibilities. If Dad doesn't want to do for himself than you can back away for now.
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OP, when you said, "He wants me to sit with him in his house forever," that really struck a chord with me because my mom always says the same thing. She complains of being lonely and never wants to be alone, even though there is always someone in the house and she has a call button she can use if she needs something. My mom's complaints about being lonely made me feel guilty until I tried an experiment. With the help of friends and family, I gave her a full day when she was never left alone for even a second. There was always someone in the room right next to her--talking or reading to her. In the evening, I left her alone and waited 15 minutes.

When I came back into the room her comment was, "No one ever comes to see me. I'm so lonely." I understood then that no level of company would be able to break through her dementia.

My mom likes small things she can hold in her hands and examine--a rubik's cube, a toy car, a little doll. Some of these types of things might help entertain your father. My mom just likes to fiddle with things--maybe your Dad will, too.
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Get him audio books, which used to be on audio cassettes but new ones now are on CDs. Your local library probably has an audio books section. If you know what genres he likes go ahead and checkout a small variety and see how he likes them. If he does, teach him how to change the discs properly. There also are online streaming audio books but I've never used those. Good luck!
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He liked to fish, but besides that he really hasn't done much since he had heart surgery about 4 years ago. He had a blood behind his eye from the stroke. The stroke was a bursting vessel, not a blockage. There is scar tissue there now, and he can't really see out of his peripherals and just not as well in general. I will look into stroke support groups, thanks that's a good idea.
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What did your dad like to do before the stroke? What kind of visual impairment does he have?
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Contact local hospitals to see if they have stroke support groups. He might benefit from being with others facing similar situations.
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Do you have a Veterans Resource Center that is not part of the VA but may be able to let you know additional options with working with the VA to support your dad more.
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Yes, there was at home rehab from the VA. I didn't see it very helpful. They gave me ideas but it's nothing he wants to do. Puzzles, computer, reading are out of the question. He's tried and gets frustrated, refuses do try more. His vision loss has been explained and it's basically he has to deal with it. This is all through the VA. Although I am thankful for the VA I don't find them very helpful. Yes, and he's been on Prozac for years, which he doesn't want to take anymore. Just a difficult time.
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Did he go to rehab after his stroke? Did the therapists at the rehab center provide you and him with ideas for activities he could do? Has the extent of his visual loss been explained and ways to compensate for it explained and explored? I'd he on antidepressant? That's the protocol in most rehabs, post stroke.
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His stroke could have caused a change in his mental status. This is quite common. Did his doctor discuss it with you and him? And heart issues can also cause depression after surgery or attack. My dad suffered depression and anxiety after his bypass, but he gradually improved and bounced back as good as before.

Depending on what the doctor says, you could ask about medication if it's depression. Sometimes meds can really lift the mood. If it's dementia, that is also sometimes a possibility. I would read a lot about them on this site so you can get some tips on how to cope.

Seventy-one isn't that old, but it could be age related decline. He may resist going to a senior center, church group meetings or socials due to being tired or self conscious. Does he have transportation to get to these places? Is there a minister or priest who might visit him?

IMO, the cause of his condition will help guide you in how to deal with it. I think once that is determined, you will be better able to form a plan. You can also adjust your expectations to what he is actually capable of doing.
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