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I feel like I tried everything to get my client to use my assistance for her real needs. I wanted to be a caregiver to help those in need. I have too good of a heart sometimes and I am not happy with the client I am with because I feel like she isn't using me to her real needs. I am constantly being told to do my chores when I approach her with conversation. She literally gave me a toothbrush to scrub. I reached out to my agency 3 times but pretty much just received a giggle from them. A few times I wanted to quit and then I feel bad and stay because for some reason she likes me and I actually do like her. As a caregiver we cook meals- she doesn't want that, we assist to appts- she doesn't want that. Help with exercise and mobility? -She doesn't want that. ALL I do is clean. Because I have been treated like a maid for so long I feel like I am slacking on my real job. They also allow clients to cancel all the time. They cancel every week, just because so it makes it hard for me to take a day off when I really need one. I went to work so many times in pain because they cancel so much I can't afford to take off when I should. I am beginning to think being an independent caregiver is better. I thought an agency would provide a sense of professionalism and stability but the miscommunication between them, the client and myself is stressful.

I have used Visiting Angels in south FL for several years now. I manage it long-distance for my 2 very senior LOs. So if I tell the agency that such-and-such needs to happen, that is what needs to happen since I'm responsible (as the PoA) and am working in their best interest. If you are hired as a companion (there is such a thing), then chit chat is fine. Their companion drives them to appointments, takes walks with them, does light housekeeping (ironing, making lunch, change bed sheets), play cards. We have a separate company come in and do cleaning (vacuuming, scrubbing toilets/showers, wash floors, etc). If a caregiver needs to do any more than that, like give out meds, or if the client is a fall risk, the agency has to send out someone who is "qualified" to do that and there is a higher hourly fee. Maybe you need to find a different agency and request to be a companion? I'm not sure about being private hire, as it is more complicated (think trying to get paid by someone with mild dementia) and you'll have to figure out your own tax stuff and find your own clients. Good luck!
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I’m sorry that you are not satisfied with your working arrangements. That is frustrating. Who hired you? Did the client or her family? What do you see that she would need help with that you are not doing? Are family members doing those things? Does she like doing her own cooking and is able to do so?

Would you explain a bit further please?

I had an agency for mom. Her needs were bathing, light housekeeping for her room in my house, preparing a light meal, companionship, playing a card game, conversations, etc.

As far as doctor appointments. I did that. PT and OT exercises I did with her as well with instructions given by home health.

Mom and I were satisfied with her most of her caregivers. The last one was absolutely incredible. She related well to mom and was a sweetheart.
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Jmartinez617 Jan 14, 2020
The client hired me through my agency. Her daughter makes her meals, she usually attends appts with her but decided she couldn't her last appt and my client went alone and didn't have an easy day. I am also concerned about her walking which i reported to my agency. I tend to follow her sometimes because i want her to be safe and she will tell me to do my chores. Her home is spotless. Let me be clear i don't mind cleaning. But i can clean AND do my job which is also to make sure she is safe. I was even asked to pick up a couch, move area rugs, clean after a home renovation (wearing a mask) which i refused to do and told them to call my agency if they need cleaning like that. They never did because it is stated that we only do light cleaning, no scrubbing. I worked with PT's and OT's so i can also help with exercises. I have another client and we get along fantastic. I do light cleaning, we socialize, i make lunch, i motivate him to walk (which makes me feel amazing at the end of the day) that is why i do this job. I know i am complaining about this other client but i do like her, i just want that same feeling at the end of the day.. like i made a difference and not only by scrubbing (lol)
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Who tecnically hired you? Is it the woman you are caring for or were you hired by a spouse, child or grandchild?
If you were hired by the woman then you are doing what she wants you to do. You could tell her that a cleaning company would be less expensive for her.
If you were hired by a spouse, child or someone else that is arranging this in her best interest you take direction from them and if the woman is not allowing you to do what you are hired/contracted to do you can discuss it with them.
If you do not want to clean and do the tasks this woman is asking of you ask your supervisor at the agency to assign you to another person that you "would feel more comfortable helping" I am sure there are a lot of employees that would rather scrub the floor then change soiled clothes, linens and give bed baths.
I am sure if the company knew that you would quit if you do not get assigned to another person I bet they would find another job for you. They do not like to loose good caregivers and would do what they can to keep an employee happy.
Before you go out on your own double check to see if there is a clause in your contract that limits what you can do, where and for how long. (lots of companies have no compete clauses)
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JMartinez, this sounds unethical on the part of the person you take care of and the company you work for. I wouldn't let someone take advantage of me. IMO cleaning anything with a toothbrush is deep cleaning and probably your duties include some light house cleaning?
It also sounds like you may have formed some sort of friendship with the woman you care for. I think you might need some boundaries. What would the lady do if you told her that wasn't part of your job? I don't mean for things to become troublesome, but maybe this isn't something you signed up for and the older employees look at it as you learning the ropes?? Can you find a job that is more of a sitter type job. No house cleaning?
Good luck and take care.
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If you are going to be a housekeeper, hire yourself out at the going rate of $30/hr & quit the 'caregiving agency' right away! Otherwise, let the agency know you'd like a caregiving position and not a cleaning job.
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Kashi60 Jan 12, 2020
We hired a helper from a caregiving agency for my mom. She does a little bit of everything. She is only paid $10/hour by the agency so she could probably charge more as a cleaning person..
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If what your client is asking you to do is not part of your employment contract then you need to put your issues in writing, then you can leave the agency if they don't address the issue with the client and they can not enforce a non competition clause.

Remember that anything verbal can be a he said/she said battle, but in writing is in writing and no one can say anything beyond what is written. So address the agency in writing and have a plan for your next job. Just in case they decide that you are a problem.

Best of luck finding a solution.
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Reply to Isthisrealyreal
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Unfortunately I think some of the agencies have their own goals. As clients they have us do a care plan. Part of that plan clearly included light housekeeping. Our goal was primarily for someone to assist mom with personal care which she rejected in combination with very little initiative shown by those few caregivers we tried, including one retired nurse. After weeks of allowing rapport to be established and my continuing to be exhausted and overwhelmed, I finally left a note for dad to give the aide on arrival and made a list of the light housekeeping tasks THAT WERE INCLUDED in their pre-printed care plan form which was in front of the binder they left in each home. The aide was not at all happy she actually had to work. I decided we ought to have something to show for the $80 we were paying out of pocket. The one day she did show some cleaning initiative she wanted me to be so impressed that she had smeared a recently cleaned (by me) glass tabletop and emptied the crumb tray of the toaster oven she had put back upside down. In addition to snooping in cupboards (note that I had made it clear the kitchen was NOT to be done at ALL.) she used glass cleaner on an abrasive paper towel on a stainless steel fridge that thank goodness still had the plastic film on it. But the clear plastic which had been flawless is now scratched up. SO...it helped me realize in our particular circumstances we might be better off privately hiring someone as needed for light housekeeping. If light housekeeping is part of your job description then you have to go with the flow and accept it. Otherwise as someone else said, you need to find another place to work where the primary goal is going to be the type of personal care and companionship you wish to offer.
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Jmartinez617 Jan 14, 2020
Not saying you.. but... I think what a lot of people read from my post was.. I WANT TO BE LAZY AND NOT CLEAN. Let me be clear. I can't stand not doing anything but i also have some disabilities that prevent me from over doing things. I was asked to pick up a couch, clean after home renovations, scrub a rug with a tiny brush. Her home is already spotless because of me. What i am trying to explain is that i know she can use me to benefit her more. I see where she needs help but she is also a brilliant stubborn independent woman. I can clean PLUS help her more. I am a people person i have another client who i motivate and it makes me feel amazing at the end of the day. Although i do like this client i do not feel accomplished at the end of the day. I dont feel like my agency listens to me. Maybe they are thinking the same thing ( "I dont want to clean") because they aren't used to people who actually care. This particular client is used to having maids so i think that is how she treats me. With that being said i reported a change in her everyday activity, I can see her struggling more and i am more concerned about that than scrubbing all day. She has a very large home and she doesn't walk well so i am constantly on top of her but she constantly says go to your chores. My priority is her safety.
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My mom received help through Council on Aging. They have a contract with a local caregiving company.

One of the workers explained to me that they offered two services from this particular company, one was sitting combined with light housekeeping (scrubbing with a toothbrush isn’t considered light cleaning.) The other service is strictly housekeeping which is more detailed cleaning and the employees are paid a couple of dollars per hour more for the deeper cleaning job.

So, I think I would clarify with the agency what they offer to clients and what exactly did your client sign up for.

If you are not interested in doing as much housekeeping then request to work with clients that need sitting, bathing, cooking and light housekeeping.

Mom’s last worker would offer to do more cleaning but I told her while I thought it was sweet of her to offer but that I did not want her to overextend herself. I’m sure some people would take advantage of her by asking for deep cleaning but I feel that isn’t right to do.

Best wishes to you.
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You should have received a document stating what your duties are.If you don't have it see if the office can provide you a copy.

If it's not in.wrting then your not required to do it.You could look into working at a NH or SNF.You will definitely have more hands on duties.Goodluck
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Just a note that some people are not so interested in chatting and may feel it's a waste of their money. My Mother is like that. She herself was always "busy" doing something. She did like cleanliness and order. So, I looked for caregivers that had a skill or talent - could be gardening or cooking for example. So they could be busy and engage her in their activity either physically or in the planning/shopping/chopping, etc. She also was not happy to have someone with her all the time. That made it hard from an agency hire standpoint. When she was napping, she didn't want someone to be sitting and waiting for her to wake up to ...chat.
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anonymous20208 Jan 28, 2020
Agreed, I have a family member who was the same way. It's so important for caregivers to be sensitive to client care and interaction preferences.
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You have a job, but this job is not a great fit for you, in a number of ways.
Options? Your agency can find a better placement, you can find another agency, or you can find another job. End of story.
This employer has made herself clear about what she needs from you. It's not going to change.
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Join a Care.com or a Sitter City type of company pick your own clients .
Does the agency give u health insurance?
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When my MIL’s aide got frustrated that she was being asked to clean, she told us that “She was an aide, not a maid!”
Since you are so frustrated that you are considering leaving anyway you need to just be straight with your client and her family.
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Jmartinez617 Jan 14, 2020
That is terrible. Let me be clear, i clean, no problem. I bust my butt. Her home is spotless. I make sure everything is disinfected and clean. I am not complaining about light cleaning. My agency specifically states light cleaning only, no scrubbing. My client is very independent, stubborn and a brilliant woman. I like her very much. I just would feel more comfortable knowing that i am doing my best job to make sure she is getting the help that she really needs. I honestly want to help people and wanted a job where i feel good at the end of the day. I leave here, not feeling that way at all. But i also don't want to give up on her because she is comfortable with me and i feel like eventually she is going to need more help and who better than me who knows everything.
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I had a client like that when I was a CNA. The basic pay is $11 an hour, I got a little more because I was ON Call, so I would get $16. When I used to pay to have my house cleaned 20 years ago, it was $20 an hour. The client I had wanted you to use ammonia here, bleach there, I felt like I was in a toxic waste site. I hated going to her house, and I think I finally refused. I didn't mind helping them with a little light housekeeping but she was ridiculous. I would organize cabinets that hadn't seen the light of day in 20 years, and try to help our the horders, which was almost impossible. It's not an easy job. But you might be 1099, which means self employed and they can't force you to go where you don't want to.
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gdaughter Jan 14, 2020
The 1099 you refer to is a tax form indicating "misc. income"...If you are an independent contractor you are self-employed and responsible for your own taxes. You can roughly figure taking 20% off the wage that sounds so great. If you don't do that IRS can come after you and you will still owe it. Been there, done that decades ago when I worked for a company that delivered daily newspapers. When you are an independent contractor you are in charge of what you do, when you do it and how you do it.
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As with any job, go back to the interview and the documents you were given that explained what you may be doing (for a client) in this position. I've never held an interview with anyone who said I won't do this, that, or the other. When I laid out the job duties, the answer was always 'yes, I can do that'. What is on the list of job duties that you agreed to when you took the job.

Go back to your employer with your documentation and review what client wants you to do and what the employer expects you to do. Employer is the agent who needs to clarify with client what will be done and what won't.

If you agreed to pretty much anything, then it's time to find another employer and ask more questions about job duties during the interview. Or become self employed. As self employed, you can be very specific with your rates and duties you will perform each day, several times a week, weekly, or monthly. Sitting with someone only at night while they sleep, with no housework at all, only cleaning up after the client should there be a potty accident, would be one rate. If a day time gig - list what light cleaning and tasks you would do (how often, specific chores like dusting, vacuum, chg bed linens/towel washing, meals, meds, errands, etc) and have a different rate for all of this. If they need heavy floor to ceiling cleaning w/laundry, meals, personal care, that would be a much higher rate.

There are people out there looking for honest, hardworking people to help their families and very few want to see the paid provider sitting on their rear end all day long watching TV or on their phone/social media. The cell phone, in my opinion, has had a very negative impact on the workforce. When you have someone addicted to checking the phone every other minute or each time they get a notification alert, they have probably been paid for several hours a day that they performed absolutely nothing for their employer. Use the cell phone for emergency personal calls, not to stay connected to the world while you're being paid by someone else to do a job. (My rant for the day!!!) If you are in a home for 8hrs a day, create a list of things that you will accomplish and charge according to how much or how light the workload will be and get it done.

If self employed, also include in your contract that cancellations (like for a vacation or planned time out of the house for client) require 1 week's notice. Otherwise, they will pay for that week or day. (Even children's day care agencies charge the parent when they are on vacation - or child loses their spot at the day care) If you are sick and cannot report to work, you should figure out what your daily rate is and deduct from amount they would owe you. You should also note that your own vacations will be planned in advance and client will be given 30 day notice. It is not so easy for them to fill the gap while you are gone.

Additionally, with the older folks who may be resistant about having someone 'help' them, be very specific in your contract about who has hired you, who you will be reporting to in regards to problems. Some of the clients don't want help, but family members know they need it. The client might fire you daily, but the person you report to/contract contact will be the person you name in contract for all communications.
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I'd leave this position and find one that puts your caregiving 'talents' to use.

Now, having said that, I worked Elder Care for a few years. They ALL expected light-to moderate housecleaning. They weren't obnoxious about it and I brought a LOT of it on myself by offering. My client would have a bladder accident and I'm going to leave a soaking wet carpet and go home?? Not on your life. I'd haul out the carpet cleaner and get all the urine out AND do a once over with 'pet pee' cleaner. The family was beyond grateful---b/c the whole enormous house would have smelled to high heaven.

My client LOVED to bake, but without me doing 90% of the work, she couldn't do anything. So she'd take charge and boss me around and I made everything in the world she wanted.

After a few months, the family was so comfortable with me I had the garage door code, the key to the 'manse', and all the cars. WEALTHY people, but super trusting. Good thing they could trust me!

And, yes, more than once I got handed an old toothbrush to clean the guck around the faucets. Big deal.

Oh, they also had a weekly maid, but a lot of things (such as the incontinence issues) had to be tackled head on. I could have left a lot of stuff for the maid, but if it was a glaring mess, I cleaned it up. Did my client's laundry and got it ALL smelling fine.

I guess I would say, don't go into caregiving if you are not very flexible as to jobs. I also did PT with my client and she hated it, but I kept her going, living at home until there simply was no choice but to move her to an ALF.

And we didn't call me her 'caregiver' she called me her 'personal assistant' which, consider her 'standing' in the community, gave me certain gravitas. Made me chuckle.
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NeedHelpWithMom Jan 14, 2020
Mid,

You have a heart of gold! Of course, they trusted you. I would too. It’s because you are true blue.
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I would speak with the Agency and let them know your concerns. You are not a maid. Let them know you need a case with more caregiver responsibility. If they are not receptive, find another Agency. You will not be happy if you are not using your full talent. Do not let the Agency or the client exploit you as a cheap maid. JMO and good luck.
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I was living with my mom, full-time caregiver for 4 yrs. Finally (many of us know that getting to 'finally' can be years of hell)--the daughters decided to figure out the LTC insurance she'd had for years (at my insistence, when I had the option for LTC policy through my employer) and set up 6 days/week, 4 hrs. a day caregivers. I was home once, soon after the caregivers had started, and was horrified embarrassed to see my mom instructing the caregiver to dust her 'miniature' house (i.e., dollhouse), and all of its microscopic decorations and furniture. I was terribly embarassed, and because I was there, was able to work with the caregiver to gracefully extricate herself from that encounter. My mom thought that the caregivers were 'hers' to do her bidding, ugh. AND, my mom has a cleaning service couple that comes in every 2 weeks anyway. : (
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Jmartinez617 Jan 14, 2020
Well dusting isn't something to be embarrassed about. I don't mind cleaning at all. As long as i feel like i am doing my main job.. which to me.. is making sure my client is taken care of and safe. I dust every single day. My day is dusting, cleaning 3 bathrooms (toilets sink and floors) making the bed, washed clothes by hand, sweeping, mopping vacuuming, cleaning 2 kitchens, one dining room, watering plants, taking out the garbage.. this is every single day that i am there and sometimes she will throw in some new surprises if she sees i finish quick. I leave exhausted and feeling like i didn't serve my purpose.
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J,

You want to nurture your clients. I commend you for having the heart of a caregiver which is an important role for the client and their families.

So please allow me before I continue further by saying, thank you very much for all that you do.

I am glad that you care about your client and like her but she doesn’t sound like she will ever be easy to please. You have gone above and beyond for her. Your job should only entail light housekeeping.

I appreciate your work ethic. Obviously, you are a hard worker but if you wanted to work this much dealing with deep cleaning you could work as an independent housekeeper and make lots more money.

I don’t blame you for being annoyed with her unreasonable requests. She’s got a cheap housekeeper! She’s quite manipulative.

No caregiver would balk at the normal tidying up. I don’t get the impression that you would be bothered by that either.

Reading about your client tells me that she is not interested in being nurtured by a caregiver. She desires a housekeeper that cleans and that’s all. The advantage for her is you are also trained as a caregiver in case a medical situation should arise.

Of course, she could benefit from your nurturing, doing the other things that are needed besides cleaning but as I said she isn’t interested.

So, why are you remaining in this position? We don’t have the power to change anyone. We can change our own behavior.

Find another place to fulfill your needs which is a desire to be more involved with your client.

Start putting your energy into finding a new position instead of placing effort into a relationship that she doesn’t wish to have with you.

Make peace with the fact that she has the right to choose the relationship that she desires, which is a cleaning person.

Acknowledge that since you are not satisfied in this position, you are free to leave and seek employment elsewhere that will better suit your needs.

Best wishes to you in your future endeavors.
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anonymous20208 Jan 28, 2020
You are incredibly on point about this being a caregiver / client mismatch. Even still, the bottom line is that part of a caregiver's professional responsibility is to respect a client's boundaries (whatever they are). I have seen caregivers attempt to push themselves or their own ideas on clients and it obviously not go well.

Having a stranger regularly coming into a person's home is unnerving for a lot of people. When that person then attempts to push their own ideas about how the interaction should go it can make it an awful experience for the client. Some of these clients already feel a sense of loss due to needing personal care and housekeeping services to stay in their homes. When a caregiver attempts to push their ideas about how the interaction should go on a client it can cause the client to feel violated. Rightly so; as it is the client (or their insurance) paying for the caregiver to provide the services of personal care tasks and housekeeping. Clients should ALWAYS be the ones in charge of the interaction. The caregiver is the employee of the agency, who is being paid to render the services the client has purchased out of pocket or through their insurance. It's the caregiver's role to perform the services; that's it. The caregiving profession understandably attracts a lot of idealists who want to help others; which is great. However, if it is more important for a caregiver to provide care the way they envision doing so over what the client is actually requesting and paying for, the caregiver needs to move on. Maybe they need to move on to a client whose requests better match the aspirations of the caregiver. Or, perhaps move onto an opportunity outside of being a caregiver, where the person can express nurturing in the way that the person most desires to.

I'm not sure what the caregiver's medical qualifications are and to what extent the person is allowed to provide medical care and in what capacities. (Some states may require you to be a CNA, etc., some may not - depends on the program). Regardless, in a caregiving arrangement via an agency, the client and the agency are the ones who determine how and what gets done (as long as it's within guidelines). Though it may not be the case with the original poster, many caregivers (often unknowingly and subconsciously) infantize their clients because they are elderly or disabled. They often see them as benefactors of their kindness and services. While that may be the view of the caregiver, the reality is the caregiver has been hired by the client through an agency to perform personal care tasks and housekeeping services FOR the client. The client and the agency are the ones in the driver's seat, not the caregiver. There are many wonderful and kind people who want to help others through a caregiving profession. However, in a caregiving scenario through an agency a caregiver is an employee not the boss.
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Ive had a few clients who seemed to feel that they needed to 'get their moneys worth". What the agencies don't tell the clients is the fee breakdown. The client is paying $24 ph, I see $12 of that. If I'm asked in a respectful way, I'm gonna do my best to make you happy.... I've had clients with a list of 23 chores to get done in a 2 hr shift. I've had clients who didn't have the manners to say hello, just " good, you're here to clean". 3 shifts was all that one got outta me. I know my worth as a Caregiver, & a high pressure housecleaning shift isn't it. I think if the clients knew the fee breakdown, they might be more considerate. or more likely pay their $ to a private caregiver who is actually earning what the client is paying. Rest assured , I have a very clear mental line concerning what $12 will get you.
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PatienceSD Jan 15, 2020
That breakdown seems excessive. Out of $24 charged to client the agency keeps 7 and caregiver gets 17. She asked for a $1 more an hour which we thought she should get and paid it. The agency told her ask whatever you want we still take$7. Our caregiver works 30 hours a week. Do the math.

You might want to find another agency that has a better split.
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i have seen websites online where caregivers have listed their profiles...which include their photo..qualifications, experience, fee structure. And the area they like to work in. Perhaps you could put an ad up on one of these sites and try out a couple of independent clients Before you resign from the agency
I would suggest you consider writing up an agreement with the client a list of what duties you will be performing and when. This will clarify & help avoid disappointments and miscommunications.
Im sure there are some clients out there that will really appreciate your good heart, in addition to your caretaking skills
:)
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Bethcares40 Jan 24, 2020
Fyi. Solo caregivers do not have the insurance umbrella of an agency. If a client with dementia falsely sues a private caregiver for " stealing or other issues"..there is no support for that caregiver. Legit agencies carry malpractice, theft and many other costly insurances that protect caregivers, as well as retain lawyers. Good agencies also have the man power and technology to book caregivers with clients and have the financial backing to make sure the caregivers get paid no matter what the situation. Solo caregivers can be screwed out of pay if a private client fails to pay.
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Hon, you need a new agency. Your service coordinator and director should be supporting you and encouraging your client to follow the plan of care. I am an agency service coordinator ( and a former caregiver.)I answer to the State , VA , insurance companies and clients case workers for the care we provide. It's your agencies job to communicate with your client and even reach out to her case worker/ physician/ mental health provider/ POA ,if she's non- compliant for personal care. Billing codes for the insurance should reflect homemaker services/ personal care/ companion care/ and so forth. If your agency bills the insurance for personal care on your client when it's being refused , the agency is committing FRAUD. All of your services to your client should be documented daily and all refusals by client for personal care need to be documented by the caregiver and then followed up on by your agency administrators. Again, it sounds like you need to quit working for an agency who is shady, and go work for one who actually cares about clients care plans and backs up its caregivers.
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It sounds like you are not lazy. Rather, you have some physical challenges and the client has a different definition of light housekeeping than you do. You might find a better experience if you indicate your physical limitations with any agency you work for upfront before taking on clients, and have them communicate this with potential clients you take on prior. Also, having your agency provide you and the client a full itemized list of all tasks that qualify for light housekeeping service (according to what the client's long-term care insurance specifies) would keep everyone on the same page. The document can also have other resources and corresponding phone numbers listed if the client needs help outside of the approved tasks list.

I think it's important to note that no two clients are the same. A caregiver cannot adequately provide care by going into every client's home with a preemptive or inflexible idea about how they plan to provide care. Every client is different, and has different psychological and physical needs. What housekeeping looks like with one client may not be the same with another. Some clients have more needs. Some clients don't want a caregiver to socialize with them, to get personal, or to sit with them; they just want services rendered. Others welcome socializing and will talk heavily with you. Regardless, it's key to remember part of the caregiver's job to give care in a way that is helpful ACCORDING TO THE CLIENT. Also, only a nurse working with the client's doctor has the right to advise a client on their personal activity. A typical caregiver's role is to provide personal care tasks and housekeeping services. It is not up to you to independently speculate on what you perceive the client's "real" needs are. It's up to the client and / or their case manager to communicate services to be rendered (within allotted options), and for you to render those services. That constitutes the service agreement that either the client or their insurance is paying the agency for. If you want to help people by interpreting their health-related needs and advising them on what to do (even at a small scale), then you must become a licensed nurse. Even then, you can get you and your agency in legal trouble by advising a client on health-related matters, when you are not authorized by their doctor to advise on their health care. Elderly and disabled clients often have complex medical conditions that affect each other. Even prescribed medical advice sometimes contains caveats depending on the situation or state of the client's other conditions. (Even telling a client to just "move around more" legally constitutes medical advice. If you are not a medically licensed nurse under the supervision of the client's doctor, don't go there.) If a client has managed care paying for caregiver services, you can be assured they already are getting medical advice and care. *It's typically mandatory a client has to report verifiable doctor visits regularly to their case manager to stay enrolled.

Elderly and disabled people often are fall risks, have mobility issues, and medical conditions requiring assistance with certain housekeeping tasks. For example, not being able to kneel down to clean a rug or throw out garbage due to balance / fall risk issues, or problems with knees etc. It's reasonable to expect a client asking you to do a task to want you to perform it the way they would. Caregiving IS physically demanding work: often requiring lifting wheelchairs, full adult human weight for cleaning / transport, etc. All clients deserve access to full care without limitations. Also, with physical challenges you don't want to harm your own health or prevent a client from the full assistance they deserve. This is no slight on you. You want to help people (noble), but you don't have to be a paid caregiver to do so. There are other careers and other volunteer opportunities that could be better suited to your physical challenges and ambitions.
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