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My uncle is DPOA currently my father is almost 100% helpless (Parkinson, dementia) at 75 my mother is 70 and can't watch him 24/7 nor can she handle his outburst. She works full time still. They have an in home health care worker but the doctors and nurses have recommended a nursing home. However, my uncle refuses. Is there anything she can do? Can my uncle be removed as DPOA for not doing what is in best interest of my father? Or can my uncle be forced to take care of my father so my mother isn't in harms way.

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When you discuss this with your uncle, what does he say? There is SOME reason for this. What does your mom want? Since she's working, she's obviously on the ball, and 70, frankly, isn't that old.

Your uncle cannot force your mom to care for your dad. There is something going on here that we or you aren't aware of. If mom no longer wants to care for dad, for whatever reason, she needs to speak up to your uncle and ask for his help in getting dad placed. If he won't, then it's time to get his POA revoked. Talk to an attorney for that.
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Follow Jeannie's advice & get DPOA revoked & see an eider law to do this.
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Your uncle's DPOA has nothing to do with where your dad lives. If your mom is unable to care for your dad at home it's up to her to decide what to do. Wife trumps brother.

Your mom wouldn't need POA to place your dad in a nursing home but I have to wonder why your mom isn't your dad's POA.
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Has your father been found to be legally incompetent, by a court? Can he still understand the concept of having someone else act in his interests? The easiest thing to do would be for Father to revoke that DPOA, and assign someone else that role. He can do that even with dementia IF he understands what he is doing.

I think your mother needs to see a lawyer specializing in Elder Law, explain the situation, and ask the most efficient and effective way to place her husband where he can best be taken care of. Perhaps this can be done without regard to the DPOA. (DPOA's don't have authority to determine where the person lives.) Perhaps she needs to apply for emergency guardianship. I don't know, but an Elder Law attorney would know and would be able to sort this out.
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