Does anyone else's parent cry for no reason?

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Does anyone else's parent cry for no reason? Some days, minutes or hours my Mom cries and cries. Singing stops them sometimes, but certainly not always. Hugs and reassurance is how I try and stop it, telling her everything is okay, etc. but it really doesnt work well. Sometimes its on and off the entire day, some days not at all. She cant really speak well to tell me whats wrong but I dont think she knows either. Sometimes she is hysterically happy and very funny, I wish that was all the time. Sometimes I get get her to laugh in the middle of a cry too, its strange. I am sure its not for attention because I sit right with her, rubbing her back, telling her I love her, and telling her stories. This has gone on for a very long time now and my patience is really being tested.
Am I alone here with this?

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does your mom talk different and stops then our of nowhere for literally no reason starts crying again?
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Is Mom's doc a geriatric psychiatrist? That's who I would consult in this situation. There are many other things that could be going on.
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SING !!!! It used to happen to my Mom all the time and my husband and I and my son and his wife would SING. Dashing thru the Snow, Jingle Bells, You put your right hand in and you do the hokey pokey, if youre happy and you know it, clap your hands, how much is that doggie in the window. etc etc etc. If they arent wet or constipated, they have no frontal wedgie and no fever, just sing!!!!!! You can also order a lawrence welk Memories and Milestones DVD for them, they love it! Good luck!@
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My mother is 78 and cries uncontrollably every single day. Her doctor thinks it is depression and has prescribed a medication, but it isn't helping. It is very frustrating, but I know she can't help it. She realizes that she is doing it and then cries because she is crying.
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My father- in -law , due to Parkinsones, lost the ability to control his emotions and was often tearful. When this happened, he felt embarassed and humiliated, which made it worse. We learned to just let it happen and tried not to respond emotionally, knowing that the tears were not brought on by the need to be consoled.
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LisaT, I am so glad you are getting effective help for your depression. It can be debilitating and there are treatments, and you are living evidence of the difference they can make! (I've been there, too. And even a professional talk therapist could not make me open up about what is making me sad, because chemical imbalance is what was making me sad!) I don't think this is a case that luvmom's mother is resisting medical help. She is on a medication and the doctor just says it could be increased. Maybe an increase is worth trying, if she isn't already at the max. But these kinds of drugs work differently for different people, and it would not be unusual to have to try more than one before hitting on the most effective in a given case. It helps a lot to have a doctor who takes the symptoms of dementia seriously, does not dismiss them as just part of the disease, and is willing to try different approaches to improving quality of life. I am so grateful that my husband has a fabulous behavioral neurologist and geriatrician whose goal is making whatever time hubby has left as good as it can be. Sadly, not every symptom can be banished, but we don't give up easily!
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yes, this is true depression. I suffer from it, myself. crying for absolutely no reason, and then the anger I feel at crying can make me act badly toward those I love. yes, she needs medical help. not all prescription drugs for depression will make one 'hazy'. ask her if she'd rather keep crying like this or if she'd like to feel better and able to do more with her life. I know meds made a huge difference with me. now I can enjoy my grandkids, and even the caregiving tasks I have for my mother and hubby are a lot easier because I'm less likely to fall into a crying jag. People enjoy being around me more, too. No one wants to constantly comfort someone else, no matter how much they care for them. If she refuses to get medical help for her condition, then, if I were you, I would refuse to comfort. Just wait out the emotion. I had to do this with my mother, as well. After a while, she realized I wasn't going to cater to her unless she'd done everything she could to help herself, and now, with new and better meds, she is easier to deal with and more enjoyable to be around. Good luck.
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JEANNE:

Point well taken. I should've read Luv's profile before commenting. I either have positive and learning experiences, and this one is both. Thank you so much.

-- Ed
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Ed, often a person with dementia can't tell you whether or not they are hungry or tired, let alone the reason for behavior like crying or flying into a rage. Sometimes they can be articulate enough to give you clues, and that can help guide your behavior. "Use talk therapy to make her open up and tell you what's hurting inside," is far easier said than done. Most of us are not trained therapists and many of our loved ones are impaired in their ability to communicate. It is a great suggestion when it applies, but it is a pretty heavy burden to lay on us sons and daughters and spouses. The other part -- show her that you love and care for her" is more within our power, and is essential. That is a perfect role for sons and daughters and spouses.
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LUV:

It's not just the parents; caregivers go through these patches of depression too. Existential angst, stress, sickness, fear of death, feeling unappreciated or unloved, guilt, memories of the people we've mistreated, things we could've done better long ago, goals set but never accomplished, or just realizing we didn't make a difference in this world because we chose not to do anything for anyone. ... Makes you wish the Grim Reaper to takes you away in your sleep, doesn't it?

Use talk therapy to make her open up and tell you what's hurting inside. Show her that you love and care for her, and that she means the world to you.

Good luck my friend.

-- Ed
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