I can't sleep since Mom died. How do I cope?

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Mom died in April after three weeks in the hospital and one week in hospice. My last vision before I go to sleep is her dead face. I sleep about four hours and wake up again with this picture in my head. I work full-time but it has been hard with so little sleep. The hospice offered counseling but I just can't go back there where she died. Can someone tell me how to cope?

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If I am in the wrong discussion here, please let me know. To everyone who has lost their parent. I did not care for my mother but I lost my mother unexpectedly in 4 hours after arriving at the hospital. I  lost my mother on Jan 2, 2017 and today marks  4 weeks and I'm not handling it well,  so I boldly walked into one of these groups 2 weeks into my mothers death. It helps me to be there, listening and learning. I am a mess with shingles and three infections in my body. Grieving is the hardest thing any human can experience. It is a difficult process but it has to be done- you have to allow yourself to grieve and it will take time. 
Besides talking to a social worker, there are fantastic Grieving Support Groups that are FREE in the city you reside in. I joined one, its biblical based and it's very soothing and I'm sure it will get better as I continue to attend weekly gatherings. Everyone in the Grieving Support Group has something in common with you ( They have lost their mom and/or dad-just like you have). What more can you ask for. These are the people you can lash out to, cry, talk about your mom or dad to because they are going through the same thing you are going through. They understand because there are grieving too. It doesn't matter how long you've been going to these groups, just get up and take yourself to one of these support group gatherings. If it takes place at a church, you don;t have to belong to that church to attend the support group. It's all about grieving......In between the support group meeting, you can continue to talk to social workers, try going for long walks, try some water exercises, water aerobics, water zumba (this helps keep the body and blood flowing and eases your mind a bit). Look into it. It's grieving for anyone who has lost a loved one. *The groups are divided into smaller groups like loss of mom/dad or siblings are in one group, loss of a spouse are in another group, loss of children go into another group.*
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Replace the recent memories with 1) A picture of Mom with good memories
2) A picture of friends, family in your room, the last thing you see before bed.
3) If you see the hard part, say a quick goodbye, and change your thoughts.

Finally, think only on these things-Phillipians 4:8

Give yourself time.
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I take Remeron for depression. Knocks me out.
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I think grief is a complicated process. The "experts" like to break it down into steps. I do think there's something to that, although we all grieve differently - spending longer periods of time on one step or another, going out of order and maybe skipping a step. It is an individual process but it is a process none the less. One that you'll go through in your own time and in your own way. My dads been gone almost four years. We were very close and not a day goes by that I don't think of him. The only thing that really helps me is thinking about him not longer suffering. In the last two years of my dads life he was in pain and suffered. But more than that daddy suffered from no longer being the person he use to be. Daddy was a larger than life kind of man. He accomplished grand things over his life. In the final two years he became a shadow of his former self and he hated it. Now I know my dad is no longer in pain. And while my dads passing has shaken my belief in God, I like to believe that if there is a heaven - daddy's there with his skiing buddies, racing down a black diamond run, knee deep in fresh powdered snow. Try finding at least a small measure of comfort in the thought your mother is no longer suffering.
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My mom died of cancer less than a month back. I'm still grieving and having those sleepless nights. I cry when I think of her on death bed. Cry even more when I think of her good times, questioning Why god have her that deadly disease. I tried aerobics, but my sleepless nights are here to stay.
I have a 1 year old daughter and soon will be getting back to my FT work. I know what I'm doing is wrong and feeble, but I find my comfort in this. Can anyone pour in some more ideas to help me out?
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Coolieslady, my mom died two days after Easter. So sorry she wont be physically present at your wedding.
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Start a journal. Start with telling her about those days in the hospital and hospice and how you felt about it. Tell her how you are seeing her face and how it is affecting you. Yell at her if you want to. I didn't have trouble sleeping because I wore myself out crying myself to sleep every night. It might take a little bit but it will help. You will be talking to the best person to vent all the negative feelings. My mom died in april also. Easter sunday. Mom was supposed to help me plan my december wedding. I wont repeat some of the things I have written to mom about that.I still have my moments but not every day and not so severe Start a journal and talk to her!
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Do you have a friend you can visit....get away....break the pattern
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I don't like Dr. Phil any more, but I saw a show he did many years ago with a woman who's daughter was murdered. She kept reliving that when she thought of her daughter. Dr. Phil was very wise and told her not to reduce her daughter's life to the last five minutes she was on earth, i.e. her death, but to focus on the many years she lived and loved and laughed and was happy on this earth. I'd say the same thing about your mom.

When that picture of her in death comes to you, consciously switch to a picture of her in the fullness of her life when she was happy. I'd find some favorite pictures of her and put those in your bedroom, so you can focus on them before you go to bed. Maybe have a "conversation" with your mom about your love for her and the life she lived and your happiness that she's at peace now. See how that refocusing on her life and not her death might work for you.
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Here in Ireland we are very superstitious we still have wakes! My dad was in the front room of his house ina coffin i thought id have a heart attack seeing him but i didnt he was dad was quite shocked how well i took it seeing him but i had to or i wouldnt have believed it! My little sister was the opposite she didnt want to see him BUT by the third night i had a chat with her and told her this was the last time she would ever see him and it will help her to move on so after a stiff drink i brought her in and she was ok after a few minutes weve never seen anyone close dead so you can imagine!
anyway some older women there said if you touch the body you wont have nightmares we all kissed him and to this day (dad died 8mths ago) none of us have dreamt of him??????? i dont know but its strange maybe there is something in it?
I felt my dad around me a few days later and signs like bday cards turning up out of nowhere spooky things so i am convinced he is around me always i just feel it and its a comfort!

thinking positive things before you go to bed is a good idea if i watch a crime movie i will watch a comedy straight after to get the crime out of my head it works for me!

Excercise is good too reading a good book? So sorry for you i know alot of people get this after a death i guess i was lucky!
Hugs its not easy!
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