What would be the best way to move my mom from VA to FL?

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She is adamant about not leaving her home. My mom has some memory issues. I want to move her from VA to FL which is about a 13 hour drive and she has never flown. I want to get her here so I can take care of her and get some testing done. What can I expect if she is adamant about not leaving home and I need to rent a u-haul to get her to FL.

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It's not always possible for our aging parents to stay where they are. Florida to Virginia isnt doable for the children to keep tabs on whats going on with mom. Nor is it reasonable for children to uproot their lives to move to Florida. Especially if they are still working. My 91 yr old mom made the adjustment from Phoenix to Iowa with no problem. Every situation is different.
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If you can't say anything helpful....why say anything? I get so tired of seeing these posters who pick apart every little thing said. You don't know the whole story, so why be so negative?
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Hi - I'm not sure if anyone mentioned the train. We have Amtrak going all the way, with car transport and sleeper cars (you go up to Springfield to get on). A friend just booked it, about $430 with advance reservations. When you tally gas and overnight stay, it compares pretty well. But I'd also take heed of the advice of moving her at this age. My mother moved areas in her early 70s and it's been hard for her. She felt in control and knowledgeable where she did live, here she still feels insecure, even after 10+ years.
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We just moved my 91 yr old mom from Arizona to Iowa. We gave her the choice of flying or driving. She chose driving. Three long days! She handled it like a trooper. She is the one who wanted to move home after 10 yrs in AZ. Several weeks after getting her her and her apartment squared away, she was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer. So now we are dealing with that.
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By the way, I find it grimly hilarious that you can say:

"It is very important for your mother to know that her opinion is what matters most. This should be applied to figuring out how she will travel to you."

in response to a post which opens:

"She is adamant about not leaving her home."

So the first step is to understand the elder's resistance to move, and the next is to ignore it, hm?
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When moving your mother it is important to understand that every case is unique. I find that the first step when moving an elder should always be to understand the elder’s resistance to move. Your mother may fear yielding her housing, financial, and day-to-day decisions to third parties. It is very important for your mother to know that her opinion is what matters most. This should be applied to figuring out how she will travel to you.
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My 85 yr alz spouse travels well in car w me driving. We drive 1200 miles. We got 2 motels. Make sure night lite in bathrm. He has flown the rd trip. Call airlines tell them dementia so need to sit togather & get a wheelchair going & arriving. Worked good 2 1/2 hr flight each way. Get a one time relaxer pill if need be. Make it an exiting trip eather way. We observe lots of beautiful clouds to make time go by driving. 2nd dY i layed his seat way back w pillows & he slept a lot. Stop often for potty & eat or ice cream. Good luck whatever you decide. Our reason is south winter & north summer God willing again this year.
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1RareFind: Thank you. Yes, 1RareFind is correct in persons being all different. Just like we are on this forum; if we all gave the except same advice, it wouldn't be very helpful. Teamwork and brainstorming are always a good thing. As far as adapting to a move for an elder, it's going to depend quite a bit on the person's age. Say a person such as my mom who lived in her same house for 54 years-wow, oh my goodness, she wouldn't have been able to adapt at all as she was 94. In 2006, she came down by car (my husband went and got her) for our daughter's wedding to our Maryland home from her Massachusetts home and she just wasn't able to walk at all when she got home.
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Llamalover47 has another strong point. Some papal may be able to adapt very well, others may not be able to adapt as well whereas others may not be able to adapt at all.

Another thought

Just like some people are able to work well with others, others don't have that capacity and may work better alone. People are who they are because God made them all different. We are not all alike and we're all wired differently for a purpose. Some people don't mind being around others a lot whereas others need more alone time. Believe it or not, even our bodies are all different.

Conclusion

We're all different for a reason. Each person has their own capabilities including various limits on adaptation. It's not just the older people who may not be able to adapt, there are some younger ones as well. For instance, one person may adapt very well in some areas but maybe not necessarily so well in other areas. If someone is not able to adapt to something, the next question is whether or not they can learn to adapt. Some situations though just cannot be adapted to, depending on the needs of the person. If they cannot adapt to something, then it shouldn't be forced upon them because it could be detrimental to their health and well-being, maybe in some cases even their lives. In cases where people just cannot adapt to whatever it is they can't adapt to, before judging remember God may have made them that way for a specific purpose. A hammer will never be a teacup and vice a versa
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Remember, Medicaid. If u ever need it, she may not qualify for a while as a resident. Each state is different. Can't you take family leave and have her evaluated in Va. Then go from there. Do u have siblings in VA.
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