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I realize there are or could be additional underlying conditions. I was just reading of prescription and OTC contributory drugs that include motion sickness etc. and wondered if dizziness is common with dementia?

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I'd check with the doctor about the medication side effects of course, but you might discuss other causes like dementia. I've read about how neurological conditions (AD, Parkinsons, Lewy Body,etc.) often cause issues with balance. Many suffer falls. Some people lean over a certain way when they are walking and/or sitting.

Has your loved one been diagnosed? I'd rule out ear infections, vertigo, etc.

My cousin who has Vascular Dementia mixed with AD, had terrible balance. It grew so bad that she would just tip over backwards, even standing next to her walker.
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Loss of balance and gait problems are very common in vascular dementia. Dizziness is also common in older people, even without dementia. My father and mother both have (or had) dizziness. My father had mixed dementia and my mother has vascular (maybe mixed) dementia.
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There is a symptom library at dementia guide dot com that covers physical changes and includes balance issues . They mention that balance problems are usually associated with late alzheimer's, but present earlier in parkinson's/parkinsonism, lewy body or stroke related dementias.
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My father has vascular dementia and his balance is seriously impaired.
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I have Lewy Body and Frontotemporal. A piece (varying in size from one person to another) of Lewy is Parkinsons, which causes balance and movement problems. I live with it daily, but it gets extremely bad if I get sick (almost like my brain disconnects from my body)--I fall and even though I know how to get up I can't get my arms and legs to move to do it, then when I finally get up I have trouble standing due to legs not wanting to work and balance problems.
Last hospital stay an OT explained that over my life I have learned to do things automatically--stand up, turn around, 'left flank, march', etc etc etc. She told me I have to slow down--take my time turning (especially sharp turns at corners and around to go the other way) in order to better maintain my balance and reduce the risk of falls. I also use a cane (walker if my balance really starts going away), ramps and elevators instead of stairs, and watch the ground for holes, dips and other things that could throw me off or trip me.
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My mother goes through phases when she falls frequently. I believe to be due to two things - medication side effects and poor judgment/memory - she does not remember/realize that she isn't strong enough to get around without assistance.
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My FIL has not been diagnosed with dementia but his balance has been getting worse the last two years especially, which coincides with very noticeable decline in his cognition, retention, and memory. The man's physique is very good for his age and he's not on meds. He's been to many doctors to explain his balance problems and, reportedly, they can't find anything. He even had a CT but I've read about brain imaging in dementia and discovered that a normal CT brain scan can still occur in patients with Alzheimer's, which means it's not the best test for diagnosis.

Here's a link to the article:
https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=77&pageNumber=4
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The brain controls all aspects of our functioning. When the brain is damaged anything may malfunction, depending on the location and nature of the damage.

Balance is often impaired by dementia.
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My mother has balance issues. It is associated with vascular dementia and small vessel disease. She needs a walker. My mother can readily fall and we need to provide extreme caution when she is out and about (outside the nursing facility). Her balance issues continue to get worse as the dementia continues to cause her cognitive decline.
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My grandma has a lot of dizziness and balance issues. She has fallen although not recently and has broken many bones. I do not know if it is because of the medications she's on, the fact she's a diabetic but a stable one, or if it's dementia. I always chalked it up to her just being 86 years old and it being part of the aging process. You start with being carried around, you end with the same.

You can talk to her doctor about possible side effects of medicine, try to encourage her to use a walker or cane to help when she does get dizzy and shadow walk with her (following her around in case she loses her balance to assist with her not falling or keeping her balance). That's what I do with my grandma. She's never alone while walking. I shadow-walk everywhere she goes including to the bathroom, to get her food, etc. She never goes anywhere without her walker and always takes it slow getting up and sitting down as to try to limit the dizziness caused by fast moving.
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