Any tips for having caregivers in our home?

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I am at the point where I need to bring caregivers into our home to care for DH with Lewy Body Disease. I'm not worried about the hiring process, but I am distressed about the thought of having someone else underfoot. Anyone have thoughts on this? Blessings, Jamie

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Maybe the caregiver felt like Big Brother was watching. Some employees don't care, others find it very unsettling even when that employee is doing her job correctly.
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@freqflyer that's why I said hidden cameras, I see no purpose in having cameras unless they're hidden. I'm not sure if the friend suggested just cameras or hidden cameras. When people know they're being watched, they're usually on they're best behavior. If your going to tell you have the cameras and the purpose, why wouldn't a caretaker want you to be secure in knowing your loved one is being well cared for??
I work as a healthcare provider for 27 years, and in homes for about 10 years, I never had problems with cameras. I always thought to myself, "If this was me or my parent, I would want my family to take every precaution to make sure no one is secretly abusing me!" Sorry the caretaker left, it just makes me wonder why?
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Sometimes cameras and recording devices can back fire, too. My Boss' wife had Alzheimer's and he had a wonderful caregiver who his wife had bonded with for almost a year.

Friends told him to install cameras, which he did, and he told the caregiver about the cameras. He mainly wanted to see how his wife was doing. After a week the caregiver quit, as the cameras were very unnerving to her as they were real-time where he could watch from his computer.

Trying to find new caregivers who his wife would bond with was next to impossible. She was in her final stage and very much needed routine. He tried to get the other caregiver back, but she had moved on to a new client. He wished he never listened to his friends.
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Thank you all so very much for your comments. It really helps me to start thinking about this topic. In the meantime, my 96 year old Dad had to have surgery and I'm focusing on skilled nursing facilities for his discharge. When it rains, it pours. Again, Thanks so much.
Jamie
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When an elderly parent/spouse have memory problems, I strongly suggest you install HIDDEN cameras or audio recording device(s). We hired a caregiver for my mom, the lady was so sweet and loving towards our mom, truely an angel sent from heaven, or so we thought. I installed hidden audio only to learn, when no one was around, the angel sent from heaven was not treating my mom the same as she did when we were around. And my mom LOVED THIS WOMAN!!! The caretaker was ignorning my mom, being rude to my mom, if my mom fell asleep in a chair in the den, the caretaker didn't even wake her up to help her to her room and into her bed. My mom would wake up 3 or 4 o'clock in the morning, clearly confused, wondering around the house, talking to herself. Bottom line, you know and trust what people show you. People are usually at their best when everyone's looking at them, you'll be surprise to find what some folks do when they BELIEVE no one's looking or listening.
Good luck!!
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ReneeMary--
With all due respect, had my clients family micromanaged and helicoptered ME, I would have quit. Yes, I expected that they would watch me and want to know what was going on...that's why we HAD to keep meticulous records of every day we worked, what we did, where we went, if she spent money, etc., I was to account for all that. A member of the family signed off on each day's work. Any disagreements were dealt with swiftly and maturely. I know that some people have had bad experiences with caregivers, but that is why you go with a reputable agency and remain in contact with the aide and keep communicating.

Maybe my experiences were not the norm. I like to think they were. You don't want a caregiver to feel like they're being watched and judged all day--you cannot do a good job if you feel you're under a microscope.

Just my opinion.
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My husband has had a caregiver since 7/2014. Go with a reputable agency and interview 2 or 3. I work while the caregiver is here but I did have a few problems at first which they said is normal. Had to be on the "right page". He has dementia and at first he knew he had a caregiver but not now. It is not cheap but I can not leave him alone is how it started out. Have a lock box with the house key in it, like a realtor box, you are to not have SS numbers, credit cards,jewelry,etc or money around--- I have a room that I lock up and a big cabinet that is locked. I make sure that they have all the supplies like diapers, wipes, gloves, etc. IT is hard at first to have a stranger in our home but now after 3 yrs he is like part of our family. He does do a few things to help me out also. GOD be with you.
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Anabel, please note that the Administrative Staff will probably erase any mention of the caregiving company, where you work. It's a conflict of interest as there are caregiving companies that pay for advertisements on the forums.
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I work for a home care agency. It's part of the home care agency's responsibility to screen and reassure that they can assist you in finding the best caregiver possible. They typically provide free consultations where you can ask the necessary questions.

I'd recommend going through a home care agency because they can handle the liability issues if a situation occurs.

If you have any further questions, contact me at your earliest convenience or follow me. I'd be more than happy to help you.
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Caregiver contract
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