What can my 93-year-old mother do for activities when she is suffering from dementia, macular degeneration, hearing loss, and not much coordination?

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We sit with her, walk her around, but she cannot stand to be left alone for 2 minutes. Recently altered her meds, so she is more calm. We are stumped. Will try anything. Already do some exercising, put a ball in her hand to squeeze and strengthen, leg stretches. She cannot dress herself or feed her self--she drops what she is holding, and cannot see the food on her plate. Does anyone have any ideas? We are all a little nutty from sitting around. Thank you!

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I've worked with dementia patients, in their homes as well as in Nursing Homes, I have found that it's not a one size fits all.. For some engaging in conversation is the most activity you will get, while others are busy body's. You have to get into their world, see if you can figure out what that is at the moment and get in there with them. I have found for some with anxiety that a heavy blanket can calm them, soft music, lava lamps, rub lotion on them. Massage their hands,feet, and back. Some enjoy having the newspaper read to them, or bible scriptures. Alot of men enjoy nuts and bolts, while some women want to balance the check book. I hope your mother, yourself, and the caregivers are all well, and have found something that she enjoys. Best wishes to you all.
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My Mom Macular Dengeneration. I remember crying when I went with her to the doctor because I did not know how bad it was. The books on tape are great. The new machines allow you to take the machine with you. We listen to them together. My Mom has loved Debbie Maccommber books. It is free in Louisiana. Although, she still plays bridge she cannot see that cards well. She just enjoys getting out and she is exercising her mind.
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My mom is 88 with dementia, substantial hearing loss. She can't operate her tv by herself, she can't hear well enough and has to use the closed captions but can't keep up with those much so tv is pretty much not an option. Reading isn't either as her dementia has robbed her of the in-the-moment comprehension. She doesn't do much, she's miserable. she can't live with me at home, she'd need a caregiver as I work and the cost is more than an assisted living facility (whre she is now). Plus she is unable to occupy herself, so if she DID live at home, I would be her 24/7 source of EVERYTHING. Entertainment, support, etc. I can't put my family through that, she lived with us for a year a while back. Any suggestions on things to do that can distract her from how miserable she is? Her dementia has progressed to where she thinks people are coming into her room, want to kill her cat, etc., and even though they aren't real situations, to HER they are and she is miserable. As am I...
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Awwh my dear! No other thing for it! Sounds like you are doing all you can - so the main thing would be to work out turns for family and caregivers, so someone is always with her.

Live-in caregivers work best as they can be on hand all the time and a family member or other caregiver can take turns to relieve main live-in care giver, as there is nothing left to do but pace caregiver's care and companionship to hours when your Mom is up. All the best!
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As a caregiver of someone with MD I was trying to come up with ideas as well, I began by gathering items around the house, small items such as a hair clip or an eraser or a tube of lipstick, things with a very distinctive shape. Then I had her take one item at a time and guess what they were based on feel. She really enjoys it and it's a great cognitive/tactile activity. I change the items for new ones every time. Some of them are easy for her others it takes her some time.
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Ive been caring for my mum who has alzheimers and is almost blind due to macular degeneration. She is nearly 80 and is constantly going back and forward to the toilet sometimes every 2 minutes for hours. even when i tell her she has just been to the toilet. any suggestions. some days it annoys the hell out of me and other days i just let her keep on going. She doesnt actually do any thing just sits there with her pants on. Jane
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My Mom suffers from the sam symptoms. She gets very aggitated if anyone, including me, tries to get her into any type of activity. She feels I think she is stupid.I am not sre how to handle it but I try to bring up old memories and the anger seems to go away.
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Today was a turning point. all of a sudden Mom want's no help. She screamed at her Aide and i had to go and intervene. That's how the mood swings can go. The woman was sooooooo patient and waited for me to get there and stayed even through all the screaming match. I love both Veronica and Linda. you were wonderful. I love all the help that the mcLean hospice in CT has given me. They are true patient angels.
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Borrow a Life Size Stuffed Animal (the giant teddy you said, "where will we put that?" and place in your chair when you need to leave a minute. She senses and sees shadows, this will help her feel like someone is attending her. Fear is a common demoninator with our EOL Alz patients; due to the brain cell damage. Place the hand of the stuffed animal in her hand when you step out. Sensory is about all she has working according to your note. - Try it for 5 minutes, then check on her. Then gradually you can leave for a bit longer. - Amanda
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Hello again! First, hd, thank you for your suggestions! When I first asked this question 6 months ago, we were struggling with finding a med to keep Mother still. She was literally jumping up every 30 seconds from the sofa with nowhere to go, did not know what she wanted, crying, and terrified of "being alone." She has been taken care of all her life, is a narcissist, and now has dementia and pretty much helpless in all regards. If I gave her a towel, she would ask, "what is it? I can't see it." Finally, after months of taking her to a psychiatrist, he put her on a new med last week. and she is the best she has ever been-- I mean as far back as I can remember. At 94, better late than never, I suppose. As for sensory therapy: I am a cosmetologist, sold cosmetics for years, have studied massage and reflexology. EVERY morning, she gets a facial, and hand and arm massage to her favorite music. I cut her hair, give her a professional manicure and pedicure every 2 weeks. She is absolutely spoiled and appreciates it, but nothing is ever enough to make her happy. She wants everything done FOR her, and never considers anyone else. But I'm OK with that; as long as she is calm and not so needy, we can live with it. Thank you, everyone, for your ideas and thoughtfulness:) christina
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