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I prepare documents and do research for the lawyer. He wants to be able to come in without having to wait for either of us to unlock the door. I am concerned that he might come over unannounced and come in and use the bathroom and my mother will see him when he comes out, and he will startle her. She is 88 and not very stable and I worry it might do more than just scare her.

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I guarantee if you give him a key it is going to get creepier.
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Your attorney employer calling mom "crazy" is another disrespect. I understand your need for extra money, but he seems like an obnoxious attorney, not a nice one. Perhaps if he refuses to supply you with a secure lock box, you refuse to continue to work for him. You should not supply him with a house key and you should not pay for a secure drop box for your house. He can call, and he can wait like every other person. This is why my hubby quit law school after 2 years on the Dean's list and moot trial awards - he did not want to be around people like that all the time!
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He knows her...in fact, he uses the name "Crazy" when referring to her when speaking to me. This, of course, does not sit well with my aunt, her sister, when I talk about him to her.
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What????? I don't care how long you have known him. This is completely out of line. With modern tech, why is anyone having to pick up or deliver documents. I realize your making a living is dependent on this guy, but please try to find others clients and then give this guy the heave-ho. Since this is also your mom's residence, she should have a say in who has a key. Maybe you can "blame" it on her when you tell him NO.
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Absolutely not! I agree with the others. There's something creepy going on with that lawyer. Soooo unprofessional!
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I agree with Dusti. I can certainly understand that your attorney is unhappy about legal papers being left unattended where anybody might just pick them up.
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Dougie… have you thought about getting a lock box at the post office or something similar where the papers would be safe and he would not come to your home. Or have a lock box attached to your house by the front door and you and he have the only keys. This way any confidential paperwork would be safe but he would not have to come inside to retrieve them. We have had a problem with people stealing packages and stuff left on our porch and the same in our neighborhood. He might understand too that he has over-stepped his bounds. Just an idea.
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He is about my age (69). I tied a spring clip on the chair on the porch so I can leave papers for him without someone having to be here when he comes. I clip a Manila envelope to the chair.
I just don't want him coming in unannounced if I am away; he could literally scare my mother to death. :(
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It's such a bizarre request that it makes me wonder if Dougie and his mother both have some real difficulty in answering the door. How long is this lawyer normally kept waiting? Is there anything unusual about how you let him in?
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This is a totally unreasonable request, even without your elderly mom factored in, even for someone you have known 18 years. The fact that he doesn't respect your request to call first or even try by the sounds of it, says quite a bit about him and his feeling of entitlement at least where your concerned too. Since he can'r be respectful enough to call ahead, something he should do on his own without you even requesting, even when you ask him to maybe he needs some training help. If waiting for you to come to the door or get home when he stops by unexpectedly is so difficult for him maybe tell him that if he calls ahead (say 1 hr or whatever works for you) you will leave what he is picking up outside the door for him, you could even set up a special box or something just for this (put a lock or code on it if that's better that you each have keys or access to). I suppose you could even just put the completed work in this when it's done and he can pick up when he wants so your sort of giving him what he wants, the ability to pick stuff up whenever and keep it secured, just not making access to your home a part of it.

Now I want to be clear, making a suggestion about to accommodate his bizarre request without giving him access to the inside of your house is in no way suggesting his request and obvious disregard for your privacy is ok. If you decide to put your foot down harder or push back on his crap, you would be totally in the right IMHO, go for it. But I get the benefits of finding a less confrontational resolve too, maybe he is just getting older or maybe he's looking for an excuse to visit with your mom! ;) lol
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Is this even a real question? 🤔
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Just say no. That's ridiculous.
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I bet a judge told him "You should know better." I hope his State Bar sanctioned him!
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Reminds me of the lawyer that broke out a car window so he could move (push) a car out of his way because his time was too valuable to wait for the owner to move. That stunt cost him over two hours pay @ $1000.00/hr.
Some are just like that.
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You've known him 18 years? Maybe he's getting dementia?
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I was going to suggest he called first but I see he ignores it.
How about setting times. Say 2 pm. (etc) and you will leave the door unlocked for 10 mins?

Definitely do not give him a key.
TELL him you cannot do this.
You do not have to explain why?
Dont let him bully you into it. (even if he means no harm)
Finish off with. "You are such I nice person, I just KNOW you will understand"
Then shake his hand and say "Thank you, so much" and smile.

Good luck
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You can see a unanimous NO on this thread. His request is beyond reasonable, unprofessional, and, as others pointed out, creepy. You have sound reasons to give him against it so hopefully he won't hold it against you as his employee.

Side note: If your state/province allows you to legally record your "no" conversation, I would, and I'd save it. Write a Memo for Record annotating what/when he originally said or asked for, the date, etc., and your response (and his). Hang on to these. If there are other requests he's made that doesn't sound right, write that down as well. Chances are you'll never need them, but...
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Ask him for a key to his home.
Lol. I see Wally and I had the same thought. 
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oh and is he going to give you a key to his home also? jk
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That sounds a little creepy. Don't let him have a key.
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Dougie...I agree with all of the prior posts….not only no but H**L no!!!!! There is no reason your employer should need a key to your home. It would be a cold day in h*** before I would give any employer the key to my home for any reason. That is not in the scope of the job nor professional on his part.

The first red flag for me would have been when he disregarded calling you before he comes over. This is my personal opinion but him being my employer and asking for my house key? I will repeat again that at the very least this is NOT professional behavior on his part. What kind of law does he practice?

If you feel comfortable I would tell him flat that he needs to call before coming over. If he cannot do this that you will either fax or email the briefs, etc to him. Just because you have known him for 18 years does not give him the right to ask for a key to your house. He can wait for you to answer the door.
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I have known him for 18 years. I used to bring papers I prepared for him, directly to his office. He has moved since...I prepare documents for him on my equipment at home. I prefer that he call me before coming over. On my cell phone. He tends to disregard this request.
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BTW, you are right.
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In your research, maybe you can do a background check on the lawyer.
Not okay to even come to your home, imo. Unprofessional. Find a way to back off
and still be employed, if that is what you want to do.

Are there any more RED FLAGS about this man? Are you at all uncomfortable around him?
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No, No and H*!! NO. Even if he is legit he sounds like a self entitled bully, no way would I let him in my house.
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Absolutely not. This is going way beyond any norm that I'm aware of.

A friend used to do transcription from home; I believe she delivered the completed work, but she may also have e-mailed it.

And I would think that in today's wired environment, the attorney could get his transcriptions and research results by e-mail as well.

Are you a paralegal or law student?

I think this is highly unusual, and unprofessional. Something stinks about this request.

How well do you know this guy?

ETA; the more I think about this the more unusual it seems. Typically an employee would deliver work; the employer wouldn't pick it up, unless it's a construction or fabrication item.
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I am worried about why your employer wants to walk into your house unannounced? What the heck is that about? My employer would never think to do this,, I can't even imagine! How about if you or mom were walking about naked..maybe from the bathroom to bedroom. Or in bed, and hear an intruder? This is totally inappropriate. And creepy
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Dougiemonty, that is ridiculous. I have worked for Attorneys and never has any one of them ever asked one of his/her employees for a key to the house.

With today's modern technology, can't you scan the documents over to the Attorney?
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I think that the lawyer can wait the few seconds that it takes for you to unlock the door. Do NOT give him a key to the door!!!!
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