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The right to food and drink.

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There are a plethora of ways the decision to have a feeding tube placed or refused. Too many possible scenarios to plan for each one. If a person believes they generally don’t want one, they can sign an advanced directive stating that if a feeding tube is needed to sustain life and there are other life limiting factors at work, it will be declined. My husband and I have each placed the decision with each other as we trust each other to evaluate the situation. With my mother, her feeding tube was placed following a stroke when we were assured by multiple doctors that there was great hope of recovery. Didn’t turn out to be true despite much therapy, though she was mentally aware. It was a heartbreaking time, but proved to us there’s no quick, one-size-fits-all answer to this one
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I have already written in my own personal health care directive and in my POLST with my doctor that I do not want any artificial feeding or hydration. That when I cannot myself take sustenance I do not wish it given to me. Your question is honestly too vague for me to answer because I do not know who you are considering this for: yourself or your loved one. I do not know the age of the person. I do not know how long this port is suggested for. I do not know, most importantly, what the expressed wishes of this person was before this decision making comes. Would love you to enlighten us a bit farther so we could better answer, and wishing you the best of luck in decision making. If you are simply asking WHO has the right to refuse such a port then the answer is the patient him or herself or the person in charge of health care decisions for the patient either appointed or next of kin. This can become very very complicated when there is a large family and no decisions have been discussed before need occurs and there is disagreement. Nasogastric tubes placed down the nose and into stomach are dangerous as patients often pull them out, causing food to be fed into the lungs as tube is removed, so ports are the long standing option. I have seen ports removed by patients, as well, as a nurse, despite being sutured.
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Do you have specific concerns or questions about feeding ports or feeding tubes, the right to refuse food and drink, etc.?  The best way that we can help you is if you have a concern that you want to discuss or a question that you need answered.
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