Anosognosia and Alzheimer's Articles

  • Anosognosia: When Dementia Patients Can’t Recognize Their Impairment

    Anosognosia is not the denial of dementia. When seniors with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia seem unaware that they are cognitively impaired it may appear to be self-denial, but it’s actually far more complicated.

    11 Comments
  • Should You Be Tested for Dementia?

    Not all cognitive decline indicates dementia or Alzheimer's. Some cognitive changes are due to conditions or diseases that are treatable or even reversible. It’s important to get tested and find out a diagnosis-whether you want to or not.

    5 Comments
  • Is Using Validation for Dementia Calming or Condescending?

    People in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia often live in an altered reality. Validating a loved one’s perceptions via “therapeutic fibbing” can be the kindest, most respectful way to handle hallucinations and delusions.

    120 Comments
  • Anosognosia Top Tips: Learning to Deal with the Confusion

    Coping with a senior who doesn't understand their dementia diagnosis is challenging. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best advice for dealing with confusion and frustration when providing care for a loved one with dementia.

    1 Comment
  • Anosognosia Top Tips: How to Handle Varying Levels of Awareness

    Self-awareness can fluctuate with a dementia diagnosis. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best suggestions for handling anosognosia- a dementia patient’s fluctuating levels of awareness of their condition.

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  • Anosognosia Top Tips: Adapting Daily Activities

    A senior diagnosed with Alzheimer's and anosognosia does not realize that they are impaired and may react angrily at a caregiver's attempts to assist with daily activities. Get advice and tips from the experience of other caregivers.

    0 Comments
  • Anosognosia Top Tips: Should You Explain a Dementia Patient’s Condition?

    Advice and tips for coping with anosognosia and dementia. We’ve compiled experienced caregiver's best ideas for communicating with a loved one who is struggling to understand their cognitive impairment.

    0 Comments
  • Anosognosia and Caregiving: Suffering from a Lack of Insight

    Commonly patients with Alzheimer's cannot acknowledge their cognitive impairment. This phenomenon, called anosognosia, makes it very challenging for caregivers to provide the treatment and care they require.

    11 Comments
  • With Alzheimer's, Denial Isn't Always What it Seems

    It's a common caregiver lament that a loved one with dementia is "in denial" about their disease. But it may not always be denial that's preventing a person with Alzheimer's from recognizing their impairment.

    6 Comments
  • Behavior Changes and the Progression of Dementia

    As a dementia caregiver, I see Mum fading in and out of reality, sometimes recognizing the severity of her illness and other times not even realizing something is wrong. All I can do is go through the motions with her.

    5 Comments
  • Denial in the Face of Dementia

    Denial is a natural response for someone faced with a serious illness, but it is crucial for dementia patients and caregivers to be realistic and open about their diagnosis and feelings.

    10 Comments
  • Communicating with a Dementia Patient: What Helps?

    As a loved one's dementia progresses, it can be extremely difficult for them to communicate with their caregiver and other family members. There are a few simple tips to keep in mind that can help conversations go more smoothly.

    6 Comments
  • Should You Share a Loved One's Dementia Diagnosis?

    Those affected by cognitive impairment don't always recognize that they have a problem. This poses a number of problems for the caregiver including whether or not to share this new and significant change with friends and family.

    15 Comments
  • Many People with Alzheimer’s Aren’t Being Told Their Diagnosis

    Many Americans with Alzheimer's aren't being told their diagnosis by their doctor. What's stopping these physicians from being upfront with their patients?

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  • Alzheimer’s: To Tell, or Not to Tell?

    A caregiver's perspective on when you should (and shouldn't) tell someone they have Alzheimer's disease.

    7 Comments
  • A Dementia Diagnosis: Bane or Blessing?

    Receiving a diagnosis is upsetting for the patient and their family, but it can also be empowering in some ways. Knowing what you're dealing with has short- and long-term advantages.

    0 Comments
  • Are Advanced Alzheimer's Patients Aware of Their Surroundings?

    Differing opinions exist as to whether Alzheimer’s patients are aware of people and their surroundings during the last stages of the disease. Once they are mute and uncommunicative, it is far too easy for us to ignore or minimize their needs. Loving family members and others who care for them would like to know how much they understand. Most caregivers believe they understand their surroundings on some level, mainly during isolated moments of clarity.

    13 Comments
  • Mom is showing signs of dementia, but doesn't recognize it. Do I tell her?

    If your elderly mother is showing signs of dementia, getting her doctor involved is the best way to tell an elderly parent they have dementia.

    0 Comments
  • Playing Along with A Dementia Patient's Realities

    Dementia can cause a number of troubling behaviors in sufferers. Delusions can be especially challenging for family members to deal with. Sometimes a simple change in perspective can improve communication and help daily tasks go more smoothly. Caregivers are often faced with the choice of grounding their loved one or validating their perceptions of reality.

    126 Comments