Anosognosia Articles - AgingCare.com

Anosognosia Articles

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The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best suggestions for dealing with confusion and frustration when providing care for a loved one with dementia.

The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best suggestions for handling a dementia patient’s fluctuating levels of awareness of their condition.

The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled some of our users’ best ideas for enabling a dementia patient to participate and contribute in spite of their increasing difficulties.

The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled some of our users’ best ideas for communicating with a loved one who is struggling to understand their cognitive impairment.

Many individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia seem oblivious to the fact that they are cognitively impaired. This may appear to be a clear case of self-denial, but it’s actually far more complicated.

Humans have a knack for disregarding or shrugging off bad news or potential threats. Denial is a natural response for someone faced with a serious illness, but it is crucial for patients and caregivers to be realistic and open about their diagnosis and feelings. Transcending the fear and stigma allows for a higher quality of life, improved communication and deeper relationships.

As a loved one's dementia progresses, it can be extremely difficult for them to communicate with their caregiver and other family members. There are a few simple tips to keep in mind that can help conversations go more smoothly.

Those affected by cognitive impairment don't always recognize that they have a problem. This poses a number of problems for the caregiver including whether or not to share this new and significant change with friends and family.

It can be a difficult decision to get tested for cognitive impairment, but you may find that there is a less serious cause behind your memory loss than dementia or Alzheimer's. Many treatable issues can cause varying degrees of forgetfulness.

The majority of Americans with Alzheimer's aren't being told their diagnosis by their doctor. What's stopping these physicians from being upfront with their patients?

People in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia often live in an altered reality. Validating a loved one’s perceptions via “therapeutic fibbing” is the kindest, most respectful way to handle hallucinations and delusions.

When the world doesn't make sense to Rodger, I sometimes have to fib to calm him down. The truth is, there's no real consensus among caregivers about the ethical nature of therapeutic lying.

It's a common caregiver lament that a loved one with dementia is "in denial" about their disease. But it may not always be denial that's preventing a person with Alzheimer's from recognizing their impairment.

A caregiver's perspective on when you should (and shouldn't) tell someone they have Alzheimer's disease.

Receiving a diagnosis is upsetting for the patient and their family, but it can also be empowering in some ways. Knowing what you're dealing with has short- and long-term advantages.

Differing opinions exist as to whether Alzheimer’s patients are aware of people and their surroundings during the last stages of the disease. Once they are mute and uncommunicative, it is far too easy for us to ignore or minimize their needs. Loving family members and others who care for them would like to know how much they understand. Most caregivers believe they understand their surroundings on some level, mainly during isolated moments of clarity.

If your elderly mother is showing signs of dementia, getting her doctor involved is the best way to tell an elderly parent they have dementia.

Dementia can cause a number of troubling behaviors in sufferers. Delusions can be especially challenging for family members to deal with. Sometimes a simple change in perspective can improve communication and help daily tasks go more smoothly. Caregivers are often faced with the choice of grounding their loved one or validating their perceptions of reality.