Vision & Eye Disease Articles - AgingCare.com

Vision & Eye Disease Articles

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The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best tips and suggestions for activities for blind and low-vision seniors.

Did you know that your eyes are just as susceptible to sun damage as your skin? The next time you head outside, be sure to don a pair of sunglasses to reduce your risk of developing eye conditions like photokeratitis, macular degeneration and cataracts.

A diagnosis of AMD can cause initial panic for an elderly loved one. As a caregiver it is important to be prepared for what lies ahead. Learn how it is diagnosed, treated, and ways of coping with this progressive condition.

Visual impairment can greatly affect one’s day-to-day function, physical health and mental wellbeing. Fortunately, there are many products and techniques that can help blind seniors and those with low vision lead safe, active lives.

Over 20 million Americans age 40 and over are affected by a potentially debilitating condition called cataracts. Most of these people are also candidates for a painless outpatient procedure that could easily improve their eyesight and quality of life.

Falls in those with poor vision are radically reduced after cataract surgery.

These 6 simple ways to safeguard your vision can help you keep your eyes healthy, no matter how old you are.

This “sneaky thief of sight” develops slowly for years, but once the damage is done it is permanent. Protect your sight by scheduling regular eye exams that can catch this disease early on.

Aging eyes need special care, but seniors don't always get it, says Craig Chasnov, a Fort Myers, Fla., optician. Prescriptions are often inaccurate because elderly people go to the wrong type of eye doctor. Older people should look for lightweight titanium frames and wrap-around sunglasses. Seniors should also check out new technology such as digitally surfaced, Superfocus and photochromic lenses.

Glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy are the four most common eye conditions among people over age 65. Learn about symptoms and preventive measures you can take to help preserve your vision.

Presbyopia happens as people age, and impacts the ability to focus on objects that are close-up, causing dangerous living conditions.

Glaucoma is an eye disease that can damage the optic nerve and result in vision loss and blindness. With regular eye exams and early treatment, seniors can protect their eyes from glaucoma and vision loss.

A team of researchers has determined that variations in certain genes involved in fighting infection can successfully predict the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in seniors.

Research proves that low-intensity laser treatment thought to be effective in slowing or preventing vision loss from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is ineffective.

There is a foundation that operates the largest public service program in America, including individual eye care. Click to read Dr. Maisel's full answer.

Glaucoma is now more reliably diagnosed and tracked for progression using technologically advanced tools such as laser scanners and digital photography. Click to read Dr. Maisel's full answer.

Senior citizens, 65 years or older, should have an ocular examination performed by an ophthalmologist every one to two years at a minimum, even without any existing risk factors. Click to read Dr. Maisel's full answer.

Glaucoma is detected through a comprehensive eye exam. Treatments, including medication and surgery, delay progression of the disease, but do not restore eyesight that has already been lost.

Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in elderly adults.

Surgery is the only effective treatment for blurry vision caused by cataracts. Here's what caregivers and their elderly loved ones can expect before, during and after this procedure.