Memory Care - AgingCare.com
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Memory Care

Residential care for patients who have been diagnosed with cognitive impairment and need assistance with activities of daily living. Memory care units are often distinct areas within larger senior housing communities.
  • People in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia often live in an altered reality. Validating a loved one’s perceptions via “therapeutic fibbing” is the kindest, most respectful way to handle hallucinations and delusions.
  • Watching a loved one progress through the stages of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias can be a heartbreaking experience. Learn more about short- and long-term memory recognition and the stages of the disease to be more prepared and have realistic expectations.
  • The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ insights on sundowning that occurs at other times of day, like “sunrising.”
  • The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best tips for keeping a dementia patient calm and engaged.
  • Mum hasn’t been herself lately, and it’s been weighing heavily on my mind. Perhaps something is wrong with her medication regimen, or it could be what I dread most: her Alzheimer’s disease is progressing.
  • I see Mum fading in and out of reality, sometimes recognizing the severity of her illness and other times not even realizing something is wrong. All I can do is go through the motions with her.
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  • When both elderly parents have dementia it's a very difficult situation. Seek your doctor's advice to find out about new medication that might control their agitation and verbally abusive behavior.
  • It’s impossible to anticipate how a senior may interact with other residents and staff in settings like assisted living facilities and nursing homes, but staff should be prepared to handle difficult interpersonal issues and defuse tensions.
  • Alzheimer's and dementia often cause difficult behavioral changes that can easily become dangerous for both patients and their caregivers. Notifying the local police and EMS of your loved one's condition can help them better handle potential emergencies.
  • Although elderly and disabled care recipients are vulnerable to abuse and exploitation, family caregivers can also be targets of verbal and physical mistreatment. What can a caregiver do when they are being victimized by their patient?
  • It's difficult for me to accept the personality changes that I may experience as my disease progresses. I'm worried about the future of my relationships, but addressing the issue head on is my best bet for gaining ongoing support.
  • Cognitive decline can cause a number of different emotional and behavioral issues that are especially challenging for caregivers. Sometimes the best option for reducing a patient's anxiety, depression, or combativeness is medication.
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