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My mother wants to change her will. Would I need a Dr. to sign something that she is competent to do this?

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Generally speaking, it may be a good idea to get an elder law attorney involved. That way you won't have any worries.
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JoAnn29, that is simply not true. As long as someone can make a reasoned decision about the one specific issue at hand, they can think they are living on Mars and the tooth fairy brings them a snack everyday. It is still legal. Diminished capacity does not mean no capacity. After all, everyone has a various level of capacity.

Here's a link where you can read about it. People that have what many would consider greatly diminished capacity can still legally sign wills.

elder-law.com/can-a-person-with-dementia-sign-legal-documents/
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Allison36, my mother had a peg tube because she was not eating due to a bowel obstruction. I insisted on the peg tube. Shortly after her bowel obstruction reoccurred and she had a colostomy. She was able to resume eating by mouth but was now bedridden (thanks to hospital giving up on rehabbing her. They saw she was 90 and had a mindset about it.) As time went on (well over a year and a half) her ability to swallow pills was difficult but I could crush and use peg tube. At some point her ability to swallow was diminished but I could purée organic food and feed her through peg tube. Also could keep her from becoming dehydrated. My mother lived 2 years longer because of my care. She wanted to live. During that time she and her 2-3 year old twin great grandsons got to blow kisses to each other and love each other. Mom passed one week ago last night as I held her hand. She fought to stay till the end when she and God knew better to go home to Him. Peg tube was right for her. That choice may or may not be best choice for everyone. God be with you as you make choices that work for your Mom.
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Allison36, what does your mother want? What would she have wanted when she was in her right mind? Did she prepare any kind of living will that can guide you with this?

How old is your mother? If she gets a tube, is there any chance she will recover her strength and be able to eat on her own?

My husband was advised to have a feeding tube twice during his 10 years of dementia. He refused both times. We had talked about it earlier, and I knew that was his strong opinion. No feeding tube. At this point in my life I would only want a feeding tube if it were going to be temporary while I recovered from something else. Definitely not something I'd need the rest of my life. Like my husband, I'll take my chances on swallowing food.

BUT this is a very personal decision. I know what I want, but I sure don't know what your mother wants. Is she still able to tell you?
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I am a solid care taker for my ederly mom ( suffering dementia and recent minor stroke )and I am in deep depression and anxiety. My mom had a recent stroke almost a month. She eats puréed diet and her swallowing is good so far, however Hospital pressure my mom to have a peg tube and I am not quite comfortable put my mom go through that traumatize procedure?
What is her option any advise I would appreciate it. This website help me tremendously, I don't know what would I do without it..
Thank you so much.
Allison
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I am a sloild care taker for my elderly mom almost 5 years all by myself .. ( she is suffering from dementia and recent minor stroke )and I am going through in a deep depression and anxiety crying a lot .. My mom had a recent stroke almost a month .. Moreover, she eats puréed diet and her swallowing is good so far she recently admitted in a hospital( painful experience ever ) however Hospital pressure my mom to have a peg tube and I am not quite comfortable with put my mom go through that traumatize procedure?
I am wondering, What is her options any advise I would greatly appreciate it.. This website has helped me tremendously during my journey..   I don't know what would I do without it.. 
Thank you so much for your support! God bless you all

Allison
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I took Dad down to the bank with his Living Will and had them question him and then notarize when they could see he was in his right mind.

Thankfully, we never needed the Living Will - on Hospice they asked him what he wanted and he went peacefully.
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Has she been declared incompetent by a psychiatrist? If not she should be able to make changes to her will as she sees fit.
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Is there reason to think that someone will object to those changes? If so and your mother's competency is in question, then a doctor's note and help of an attorney are a good idea.
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I notice that the OP doesn't actually mention a lawyer.

Fromz, could you say a little more about this situation?

Are *you* confident that your mother is competent in this sense?

Are you planning to get this change made through a lawyer?

If your mother has mental capacity, then I completely agree that she can do as she pleases with her estate and let nobody stand in her way. If she has not been formally assessed as being incompetent/lacking capacity then you don't need a doctor's certificate to say that she's fine (I agree it can't hurt); all the same you'd better get a lawyer to make sure her new will stands up to future scrutiny.

But there are "buts" to this. Not stopping her doing what she's every right to isn't quite the same as assisting her to do something you have legitimate concerns about. Are you sure you're happy to get involved?
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Does she have a Doctors note or diagnosis stating that she is not competent?
If she does not have such a diagnosis then I would doubt that she would need a note stating she is competent.
If after talking to her the lawyer thinks she is not competent he will refuse to make changes that she wants. Then you will probably either have to find another lawyer or go without the changes.
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Does Mom have Dementia or Alzheimers? If in early stage and understands a doctor note will probably be a good thing saying she knows what she is doing. Otherwise once the Dementia/ALZ sets in they cannot make informed decisions. No lawyer worth his money should make any changes.
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