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In all of our dealings with mom who has dementia and won't allow us to help her, no one has suggested APS. We are waiting trial for guardianship and today somone asked why we didn't seek the help of APS? All I could remember was reading somewhere that we wouldn't want them involved. So tell me why?

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I worked for a Visiting Nurse Assoc. We had a husband and wife the nurses cared for. They lived in a trailer. They had two hospital beds in one bedroom. Nurses had a hard time getting a wheelchair down the hall and in and out of the bedroom. Phone was just out of reach so husband usually dropped it. The place was dirty. APS came in and saw no problem even aft my boss said they wouldn't be able to get out if there was a fire. Children didn't seem to care. The couple was in their 80s.
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I wrote recently on another post, which I don't remember now, of my limited but extremely negative experience with them. Some of my family members reported the self appointed family member who was the caregiver. Photos were taken, incidents documented; fraud had occurred. Close relatives were being denied contact with their loved one.

The caregiver in question was manipulative, dishonest, and emotionally unstable. That had also been documented through outside sources.

APS "investigated", spoke ONLY with the so-called "hospice" company and possibly the caregiver, but ignored the photos, and said they felt the caregiver was going a good job. Besides, added the so-called caseworker, this person "was a few weeks away from death anyway."

To say that we were livid as well as disappointed and fearful is an understatement. The loved one in question was literally a prisoner in her own home. But APS felt she was dying anyway and the "caregiver" was doing a good job.

To honestly express our anger, disappointment and contempt for APS would likely involved a choice of words that aren't consistent with use on a public forum.

I've also contacted them trying to find assistance for specific issues which I can't recall now (I think I was looking for outside help for major cleanups, something like that perhaps) and got no suggestions. It wasn't even an issue they would consider.) That was the second contact with them. And it's the last.

APS can be manipulated, as I also saw when SW who I refused to allow contact hinted about involving them.

Why wouldn't you want them involved? Although I don't specifically recall your situation, my answer would be that I think it's unlikely they would be of any help anyway. If you're already involved in guardianship proceedings and have a good attorney, that's a better option than involving an agency with a mandate which might not contribute anything at all. Again, I don't recall your specific situation, so my comments are qualified.

And from what I've read here, there are instances in which a caregiver is blamed, because he/s he seems to be an easier target than hostile, complaining and vengeful family members. Sometimes it's the "squeaky wheel" that gets the attention.
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I have had only brief exposure to APS. They are unprofessional, do not honor confidentiality and easily duped. Like most other state agencies in Texas, they are usually understaffed & over worked. They not only give details regarding the person that reported, but they also give advance notice as to when they are coming by for a visit. I guess they are used to seeing really horrible conditions, etc because anything impresses them or are they just overlooking the dog poop in the middle of the floor?
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In my state, each county has its own APS. When Mom was alive, she and I lived in neighboring counties. On Mom’s county’s website RE aging issues/assistance, there is one paragraph that describes their APS. This agency is geared primarily toward separating elderly from an abusive caregiver. All good. Then one oblique statement regarding elderly self-neglect, which they pursue as a failing of the adult child(ren). From that point on, there was no way in h*ll that I’d contact APS for help with my intractable mother. And spent the next few years sh*t-scared that a well-meaning neighbor would contact APS on my mother’s behalf. As if I didn’t have enough else to worry about. 😟
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Mom was living in a senior non-assisted living apartment complex with meals and transportation provided. Her neighbors were giving her drugs to help her "terrible headaches" (that she's had checked out- with no diagnosis and no medication that will cure them). They also took her to the doctor for narcotics (completely unknown to me!) She started taking the meds and really went "loopy" and I couldn't figure out why. She told everyone in the building that I "threw her on the floor and stole her meds." WOW! I knew nothing about it.
Someone alerted APS and they came to see her. Immediately it was clear she had dementia. There were no broken bones, no bruises and her meds were sitting right on the coffee table. Her case was dismissed BUT NO ONE FROM THE APS OFFICE EVEN NOTIFIED ME! I'm her only child and POA.
I got wind of it through the building manager and I called APS. They said that the case was resolved and they don't have enough time to call family members to follow up!!!
Incredible!! If she was that confused, why didn't they contact me to place her in a memory care facility (which is what I did a month later.)
I really can't say much a nothin' good 'bout 'em.
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I appreciate reading this. I had been tempted to call them for my grandparents, but was talked out of it by my mother. Grandma died of a stroke a week later, and I always felt like garbage not calling them. It helps to know they could really make things worse. It's sad that an organization that is created to help people can cause so much harm. 
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I do not know what APS can do.....has anyone had positive responses are actions?  The point is the patient is the number one concern...they should be getting the proper medical treatment and care.

Exactly what does APS do when they come in...do they notify you prior to coming or do they just show up?  And exactly what evidence do they gather...who do they speak to and how do they render a decision?   When and how are you notified of the decision?   What happens to the individual at the center of the investigation? Where do you go from there? 
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APS is overworked and overwhelmed. When I was investigated, after a few relatively short conversations with my stepdad and mom, I did not hear again from them for a couple of months and it made me nervous. When they finally returned to the house I was told that they loved cases like this, it was obvious nothing was going on either financially or emotionally. They have so many cases that are real and very, very sad they have to give them priority. So, those of us that really do not need their help or their investigation are left wondering. Why was it so easy? Because I was completely open with them, did not try to hide anything, invited them into our home. And I received very high recommendations and support from neighbors and other caregivers, doctors, and the day program.

If you need a recommendation and support from someone, hire a geriatric care manager to come in and assess the home conditions and the care received. You need someone that has had no interaction with you for APS to speak with especially in a contested guardianship situation.

Always remember, unless the parent is incompetent, they have the right to do what they wish with their resources, and live the way they want. And the judge will take a great deal of value in that. If they do not want to do as you want, and do a good job of expressing it, the guardianship will not be granted. Also, your reputation and criminal record (I am not saying at all that there is one) will be of primary importance. If there is anything shady in your background, the guardianship will not be granted.
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For me it was a waste of time. Common sense has gone completely out the window. My dad was sent to the ER for fractured ribs. When I saw him, he had a black eye, like someone punched him, a severe UTI and one heck of a yeast infection. Common sense tells you that this is clearly abuse and neglect occurring in the NH. ER filed a report as well as I did. It took the investigator 14 days to investigate the facility. My dad is on his 19th day in hospital because the previous home tells the homes inquiring about him, that he is a problem patient. APS found no evidence of abuse or neglect. The NH lied out their kazoos and investigator allowed it and is allowing others in that home to be neglected and abused.
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It's sad, isn't it? A state agency in place to help our weak & vulnerable and it is just a joke.
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