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washing familys clothes, iron family clothes, cleaning kitchen throw away recyles,vaccum kitchen ,putting dinner and breakfast dish in washer and put them away,cut veg for dinner,sometimes babysitter for child,wipe out refrigator.

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If this is a private business relationship between the two of you, it is up to the two of you to decide what is and isn't included in your job duties.

If you work for an agency, the agency should have a contract that spells out what is expected.

If your client is getting Medicaid's Elderly Waiver aid or some other county/state program, they probably have guidelines for what is considered "caregiving" and what is considered "homemaking" -- and their pay rates are different for those positions. And generally the service is only available for the client, not the family.

Good luck in resolving this with no hard feelings.
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HA! My Mom's caregiver agreed to do "light housekeeping" when we arranged for her to do Mom's care. Then never did it! Said she was "allergic to dust". LOL. So we ended up arranging for someone else to come in every 3 weeks to clean Mom's house. I actually think it worked out best, because Mom's needs have increased since our aide came on board 3 years ago.
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Yes set limits, our caregiver does dishes sometimes, and laundry. But I want her to be with my mom not my housekeeper. Unless that was the deal going in, you need to have a sit down.
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I agree with the two others about needing an understanding and I know you kow that now. So gather your wits, sit down with them and explain what all you are doing, and if they want to treat you well and reward your hard work, and you think you'll be happy there, great! If not, give them your two weeks notice and the next day hand your resignation. Pleease keep me posted aout your progress. I care. Susan gr8fulnurse
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Oh man, you are definitely being taken advantage of. So sorry to hear that. Good luck in getting this resolved quickly...or moving on to another elderly client.
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You should have set limits before you even went in there. Sure, some light housekeeping and cooking may be expected to be done for the elderly client...but the whole damn family? No. Were you hired as a care taker for the elderly, or were you hired as an all out maid and babysitter... You should have had a clear conversation about what was going to be expected of you, and what you yourself were willing, and not willing, to do. Baby sitting? Doing their laundry? I would have laughed in their face. They've obviously mistaken you for a maid, not a care giver... You need to have a little pow wow with the family. Soon.
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