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Respite care is all we need. Signing permanent...is scary. why won't insurance pay for respite care?

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Thank you for these great responses. Good validation!
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The state DOH sets the admission rules. Whether you are there a day or a month or longer, you still have to jump through all the hoops.
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We had to fill out about 100 pages for my dads respite care.. and get tons of things from his Dr, as well as a chest XRAY for TB. Luckily when it turned into hospice care in week 3 everything was done. I agree with CW, initial out anything you don;t think seems correct and have them initial it.
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I would advise you to always sign as POA for____. And if they don't have an appropriate form strike out/pen in any amendments necessary and initial them, have the admin initial them too.
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I would be very careful not to sign any contracts for "permanent" care.

It would make sense, though, that they would want the same health information, contact information, etc. for someone who would be there only 3 weeks as for someone who was moving in.

So ... what kind of "papers" are you being asked to sign?

If this facility doesn't do much respite care they may not have separate forms for that situation. That is their problem, and one they should solve. Insist that the contract is suitable for a temporary stay.
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Not much info here.....What insurance? Medicare, Medicaid? Who is this social worker? Hospital? Nursing home? Does the SW think he is not getting proper care and advising that he be admitted to a nursing home?
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