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My grandma complains that her legs hurt and that she has trouble getting up. About three years ago, she received physical therapy while in assisted living and she did very well with it. I was thinking that maybe she needs therapy again since she's complaining so much about not being able to do things and everything being hard. If she can't get up and walk without help, she may have to go back into assisted living and she does not want to.


My thinking is that if she starts out with outpatient therapy once or twice a week for a month, then maybe we can stop and I can help her do therapy at home a few times a week. I figure it's better to start with professional help in case there are issues.


Do you all think it will help? Any suggestions?

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Physical therapy is always appropriate if the patient is capable (mentally and physically) of understanding and following the directions given.
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My dad has received PT for leg weakness before, with mixed results. I believe it’s been of help overall, limited by his poor attitude about it, his age, and his propensity to sidetrack things by joking around with the PT staff. The doctor can easily write an Rx for it, it’s worth trying
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Grandma says her legs hurt and she has trouble getting up. (Probably from the pain.)
Is this the first time she's had leg pain? Did she have physical therapy for leg pain previously?

At this point, you don't know what's CAUSING the pain. A trip to the doc might tell what's causing the pain. If it's disc, vertebral problems
or siatica nerve pain, it will be difficult to treat in someone your grandmother's age. Also, the leg pain could be from other causes (muscular, vascular (restricted blood flow), lack of certain nutrients, etc.

Since she had a good recovery with the last go round with PT, you might want to ask the MD for a referral for evaluation.

Has your grandma had back or hip Xrays recently? Does she have diagnosed osteoporosis or take a medication for osteoporosis?


Your thought for PT for the exercises is a good one. Providing everything is OK for her to exercise, Grandma will have to be real motivated to see any change.
Some say they want to get better but they don't have the energy to exercise.

How long has she been unable to stand? The longer she has been unable, the more difficult it is going to be to return to it.

She's 92. Your expectations need to be in line with her age group and pre-existing conditions.
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Be aware though, at 95 her legs may just be giving out. A person that has falling problems does not need to be walking around without help. Even walkers are not a cure all.
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Sure it can, my mom in her 90's benefited greatly from some very simple exercises, both seated and standing. (Many of those same exercises can be found on the eldergym website)
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I don't seecwhy not. You need to call her primary and have him write an order. A homecare person will come out to the home and evaluate ur grandmom. If they feel she could benefit from therapy they will set her up forca couple of times a week. Medicare will pay 80percent, her supplimental may pick up the rest. The homecare hasvto keep Medicare informed of her progress. If its found she has reached a plateau then Medicare will no longer pay for the therapy. Even if improvement, therapy is only given for a certain number of days, I think. But, after a period of time, she can start again but again a dr note is needed.
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