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Freqflyer is correct.

Unless you are a cosigner, you aren't responsible for the debt. Legally, only the account signors are responsible for the balance, and upon death, the estate is responsible. If there's no estate, there's nothing to pursue. There are stories out there about companies attempting to be paid by the family, but legally, unless they co-signed the account, the family members are not responsible.

When my father's partner passed away, I sent a letter to the one credit card company that he had passed away, gave a copy of the death certificate, and informed the company no estate would be opened and I was not legally responsible for the debt. The company acknowledged my letter. There has been no followup or harassment or the like. If we had opened an estate, the company would have jumped in line as a creditor. For my father-in-law, there were assets although we didn't go through probate, so the one account was paid and closed.

I know the same thing happened with my grandmother's accounts when she passed, as well and that was 25 years ago - a phone call was made, the account was terminated, and my aunt wasn't held responsible for the debt.

Best wishes.
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Stacie, you wouldn't be responsible for your Mom's credit card [unless you had co-signed the application], but your Mom's estate would be responsible via Probate. If your Mom left no estate, then there isn't anything the creditors can do.

I hope other caregivers here will chime in, in case I have misinformation.
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