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My understanding is that you want TO AVOID if at all possible being a SS representative payee because of the end of the year reporting requirements and separate banking issues. Some situations - like SS death benefit for kids - you have to be the representative payee. But for most seniors, you kinda just want their SS income to go direct deposit into their bank account and from that they or you as signature on the account pay for their needs and their care. You do want to have always in their SS deposited bank account, the full amount that they get each month as a base amount. SS does a clawback of the last payment usually upon death and you don't want to find yourself overdrawn after they die. This period is stressful enough without dealing with that.
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My husband is not on Social Security disability. He is on retirement social security, and he is 90yrs. old. I am 23yrs younger than him, and make a lot less on ss them him. Wendala I sure hope you are right. :)
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I am representative payee for my husband with Social Security disability income. Social Security provided a booklet that explains the responsibilities of being the representative. One of the requirements is to have a separate checking account for this money ... and a separate savings account for any money that has not been used during any given month. I was told that his SS disability income is to be used for him, which includes household expenses, house payments and car expenses when when they are in his name, etc. Keep receipts and a record to file the year-end report.
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I'm not sure I understand this question, and I'm trying to anticipate what may be coming down the road when my husband begins collecting SS which will likely be within a year. We have a joint bank account and I have always handled paying bills, most of which I do electronically. He will not need a representative payee, but even if he did, we share a household and expenses, so wouldn't paying these things be appropriate to continue to pay from our combined income. I just began collecting SS this year and it goes to the same joint account. Am I missing something that will change?
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I had the same question last week and fortunately had it answered by someone at the SS office. Yes, you may use it for your daily living expenses. Food, clothing and shelter. That means your family's bills too.
I too will have to keep track of how my husband's disability money is spent. I was also told money can be used for furniture, or a car. Neither of which we need right now, thank goodness.
If you have questions, make sure to call your local office or stop in and talk to them. They were very helpful to me,
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I believe his SS is to be used for him only. You will have to give an annual report about how you used the money. Hope this helps.
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