Follow
Share

He had a stroke and has been in a hospital for about a month already. They are ready to move him to a home even though he is still having medial issues. We are going to have to put him In a home either way but we are not worried much about the insurance because he has insurance and medicare part a and b. we are now concerened about the needs of his wife. They have a home that is paid off (so no worries there) but they do have some credit cards and veichles under his name. How can we help her with living expenses if the short term disabillty is only 125 a week?? I really don't undertand what the next step would be to take :(

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
M -A union and not a railroad retirement, correct? If union, I would first go to the union to see what the member's household & survivors benefits are. If your union is still active in your area, then there is going to be a local HQ with a rep who deals with benefit co-ordination.

I'm not union (right to work state) but am union eligible. Lots of folks I've worked with over the years are union. Work under a union approved crew-deal memo on most tiered projects. Union can provide for lots of benefits for family or those living in the union members household. After Hurricane Katrina, one of my union friends, got the union to pay the costs to move her deaf dad to a specialized NH for care. They co-ordinated the whole thing and paid all the costs as he was a member of her household. Truly a godsend for her. She had no idea this was a benefit.

Once you clearly know what union may or may not pay, you can then combine those details with their other finances to see if they need to do a spend-down to have him eligible for Medicaid to pay the NH or it there are other options. Please remember that she - if NOT herself going into the NH - qualifies to be the "community spouse" under how Medicaid runs. She does not have to impoverish herself, only hubby does. Most states have it such that the CS can have 113K in liquid assets plus the usual exempt assets (home, car). If she as the CS needs some of hubs income to enable her to live in the community, she can apply for MMNA. MMNA = Monthly maintenance needs allowance. It is kinda like old-school alimony for the NH set. Instead of all his monthly income being paid to the NH as per Medicaid's "SOC" or co-pay requirements, she can have all or a part of his monthly income diverted to her as her MMNA. The MMNA varies by state, like for TX, MMNA maximum diversion is $ 2,300.00 & that is quite a lot of $!

The whole CS situation is pretty different than Medicaid for a widow or widower. I'd really suggest that you get the union info and then see an elder law attorney to go over the best options for a CS. Somewhere I read most CS outlive their NH spouse by 12 years. That is a long time and you want to make sure she gets all the income & assets she can to be able to continue to live in the community and not become the penniless old lady eating a can of tuna for the weekend.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Someone needs to sit down with wifey and go over their financials and their bills. Doubtful he'll be able to return to work. Suggestions might include selling the car with the highest payment and, hopefully, being able to pay off the car loan. Selling their house and using the proceeds to pay off their charge cards, etc. Moving into senior housing of some sort -- usually pretty nice and less expensive than other alternatives...or maybe just an inexpensive regular apartment if the senior housing isn't available.

If they aren't collecting SS, they should apply, unless she's making a whole lot more working. The SS won't be taxable in all likelihood. I don't believe one can collect on a disability policy and SS at the same time.

His rehab will be covered by Medicare up to 100 days. Rarely does anyone stay that long, because unless they have a real skilled need or keep showing progress in rehab, it's discontinued.

What was their plan? Hopefully, they had one. But in order to help, you have to know exactly what income they have and what expenses there are.

If you don't expect her husband to be able to come home, I strongly suggest your friend spend $300-$400, get all her financial information together, and talk to an elder law attorney. If he needs ongoing nursing home care, she's going to want to try to preserve as many of their joint assets as she can.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

At age 67 and 66 they are each eligible for social security retirement benefits. Even if she is still working, she has reached full retirement age and qualifies for benefits. The couple clearly has other income, no one can live on $125/week sick or healthy. That wouldn't pay for taxes and utilities never mind food/car expenses, etc. You will have to look into this further.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

He is supposed to go to a home for rehab but now he has a blood clot in his left arm and he is haveing trouble with his kidneys. In my opinion, he will not be a able to go back to work. He has a stroke that bled into his thalamus and he is diabetic. His body is working against him. Everytime they fix one thing something else happens. So SSDI is different from the regular social security he would get? He his 67 and is wife is 66. He has Medicare and insurance that covers 90% of cost....how would we supplement the remainder of his care?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Is he going to a "home" for rehab? Is he expected to recover and return to work? If not, has he started the process of applying for social security disability coverage?
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

If he is on Medicare, she should also be getting benefits, unless she is still working. Sell his vehicles, and put the money to his care.
If he is going to a Nursing Home, be aware that Medicare does not cover that.
Go up to the Money and Legal tab and click on Paying for Care.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.