Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Dear Abservice1: In the last year of my father's life I saw how emotional he became. Things that never upset him before, like watching a show on Lions in Africa would make him tear up and cry when he saw another animal killed. This honestly took me by surprise as my Dad had been a rancher and broke wild horses at one point in his life.

I have seen this same behavior with my mother this year......HONESTLY LIFE BECOMES MORE PRECIOUS! Simple things make her cry that she would have blown off years ago. As I get older I see within myself the desire for kindness, gentleness, love, peace and beauty. Maybe we just begin to see what is really important in life! Maybe it touches our emotions.

God Bless You and Your Dad!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Treating bi-polar disorders is a very tricky road to climb. Most patients do not show their "good" side when confronted by the doctor. Your opening statement was about crying. So that the physician may choose the correct drug, you must disclose all the behavior episodes, the good, the bad and the in-between. Good Luck! p.s. A neurologist should not be diagnosing depression, neither clinical nor situational depression.( very common).
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

But antidepressants can really help.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I actually read this thread looking for answers and I realized I have the answer and wasted my time here. Older people cry more, especially after heart surgery or in their 60's because we realize our mortality. When we see young love, sunsets, puppies etc, we realize these experiences to us are no longer infinite. We are in the rhelm of goodbyes and making peace with everything dear to us keeps creeping up in our psyche..
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I am sorry to read this as it saddens me. Sometimes I pick up my Mom from Daycare and she is SO happy! Other times she is sitting and crying. Her neurologist said its depression. Some mornings she is escatically happy and sometimes she wont get out of bed. This makes for a difficult morning when I work. Anyone else go thru this?
She had 2 cerebrel hemmorage strokes in Nov of 09. Upping her antidepressand dosage really helped a lot! She is mostly happy now but not always.
Today I picked her up and she was crying and doesnt know why either, or cant explain it. The Daycare had an Elvis Impersonater there and she was happy and danced they told me. I know her and she loves music so I am sure it was true. At least today, I realized that her crying was from feeling overwhelmed and sitting alone, TOO much stimulation maybe? Regardless, we hugged long, and kissed and she talked a bit crazyy and comfused so I kept saying to her , "Mom, I took care of it all, I did everything and you have nothing to worry about." Just telling her I took care of it (whatever she is thinking) and that we are going "home" for supper. She always says "really?!!" Music in the car also helps. If it happens at home I say "listen Mom, you dont have anything to worry about because I DO ALL the worrying for everyone" She says "really?" I think of it as a person being blind and inside themselves they are all confused. I think lots of TOUCHING, HUGS, and REASSURANCE helps. Touch means so much at this stage I think. It kills me when she asks for her husband or that she is going home to her "mother." As the Alzheimer's group told me, I agree with everything and do a lot of lying to keep her happy because she forgets in 10 minutes anyway. "oh ya, you can go to your mothers in a minute." then she forgets but it keeps her calm at the time. At night I sing her to sleep and use her name in the songs, sometimes she laughs. I make up songs how we are here because of her and how much we all love her. I was told that when you sing to them, they listen with a different part of their brain and understand it better, it seems to !! She can sing better than she can talk. When I tell her "I am staying here all night, so you are safe and I am right across the hall," she said "oh thats so nice, thank you." It seems to make her feel safe. I hate the crying episodes , its interesting to read it could be from the strokes. Hugs to everyone out there caring in their homes, living it is so difficult with practically no nights or weekends off day in and day out, month in and month out, and year in and year out. We get out sometimes but it take a lot of planning.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

ASB:

If I were in constant pain and felt so helpless and hopeless all the time I'd be depressed too. He's trying to be strong and preserve the image of the man he used to be by hanging on to what's left of his dignity, so of course he'll deny it. He doesn't want to be a burden to anyone.

Imagine yourself in his shoes. How would you feel? Would you dare show it and risk others treat you like a feeble old man/woman?

-- ED
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I understand that after heart surgery, being depressed is the normal thing for many people. Could that be it?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Sorry for not giving more inforamtion on dad's medical history. It's been really stressful for me, and Im not myself....
My dad's 85 yrs old, had a pacemaker implant in November 2009, moved from Texas to California, was diagnosed with hyponatremia and hospitalized for a week, and found to have mild dementia. He enjoyed walking,eating out with friends, and his dog. Now he need the assistant of a walker, and need more care. He just crys all the time for no reason.
I feel he may be depressed with all the changes in his life....
I will discuss with his doctor next week.
Thank you for all your respones,very helpful.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I just had another thought...Have his thyroid checked out, too. An imbalance there may be a more likely cause.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I have a friend who sheds a few tears whenever he laughs or gets very nervous, and he's been like that since his late-30's. (He's now in his mid-50's.) A few years after we became friends, I asked him about it, and he said that it has to do with his blood pressure, for which he has been taking medication since before I met him. You may want to check your father's blood pressure or have a physician check it if for no other reason than to rule it out.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

You might also want to check his medications. My mother has hydrocephalus and some of the neurological medications they gave her over the past few years have made her really moody - mostly toward the sad side. I now know to look out for those sudden changes and let the doctor know the medication isn't working out. At one point she was waking upin the middle of the night sobbing and she really didn't know why.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I'm 55 now, I had a stroke at age 30, after the stroke I could not control my tears, tears of joy, saddness ect. I would cry at the drop of a hat for no reason, it took 3 or 4 years to get over it, I still occassionaly get over emotional about something insignificant. This is probably your dad's problem, I hope I helped. Jan
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Yep, stroke ( mini) it is. If he is not depressed and cries for no reason, it is most likely a brain dysfunctionality.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Has your dad recently had a stroke? This goes with it if he has, crying for no reason at all.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Not knowing anything about your Dad's history, physical or otherwise, i personally would have no idea why this could be happening, or even what to suggest. Is it possible to give more information?

Sorry!!

Hap
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.