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When an 82 yr. old man has his name listed on his car title as follows: Sam and Sally (not his wife and no one who's listed in his will) and he dies and the will states that his only child gets all of his $$$ and assets, will "sally" have any legal claim to his car? This was done so he could pay less for his car insurance by being added as an additional driver on "sally's" car insurance. Is this legal, will "sally" get the car after his death even though that was not his intention?

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Sally is taking the risk, and Sally deserves the reward.
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Late thought -
If insurance is too costly for Sam to handle, is the "only heir" able to assist her father so he can keep it in his name?
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I agree with purplesushi. He can do what he wants with his property while he is alive. The assets that remain belong to the estate. The will shouldn't have to be changed to give her the car if her name is already on it when he passes, if he wants her to have it.

Does she provide transportation for him or other care-taking services? Does she use it herself? Too little info is provided to help understand her involvement, IMO.

Ferris1 makes an important valid point about the insurance fraud. His assets should cover the cost of his car insurance when the car is put in only his name. Is he still able to drive? Is there a loan on the car? If so, with whose name(s)? Has she made any payments on it with/for him?

What is Sally's side of this situation? Is she benefiting in any way or is she "only" involved with the insurance savings as a "favor", fraudulent nevertheless, I believe.

An attorney is your best resource if Sally doesn't remove her name from the registration. Is the value of the car worth the cost to pursue legal action, if necessary?

Sam should be prepared to cover the insurance cost (based on his age and driving record) for the vehicle he drives.

Please keep us advised of your progress.
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Technically if she is on the title, she is a co-owner regardless of "why" her name is on the title. Does "Sally" seem like the type of person to take advantage & keep the car after he passes? For all you know, she has no intention of keeping the car and has every intention of honoring your father's wishes & signing it over to you after he passes. I think there are too many assumptions being made here, and unless he's on death's door (doubtful, since he's still driving) I wouldn't stir the pot by asking...you may not like the answer you get. It IS his property to do with as he pleases, afterall, and wills can be changed.
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Having owned and operated an automobile title document service decades ago, AZ's law state whomever is on the title is the registered owner of the car. Before this 82 yr. old dies, get "Sally's" name off the title. Check with the insurance company and find out how much more he would have to pay with only his name on the insurance. Putting another person on an insurance policy for intention of defrauding the insurance company may have consequences.
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You got the money "Sally" got the car If you need the car, see a lawyer or find "Sally" and discuss business with her
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If Sally has no use for the car, ask if she would sign it back over to the heir. I am hoping that the loan is paid off.
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First I'm sure you are asking this to figure out how to get rid of the car. Go to AAA if you are a member they may be able help or point you in the right direction. Always can ask a lawyer, maybe one is available at the Senior Center once a week.
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First, it is difficult to say that he didn't intend Sally to get the car in the event of his demise, I think. He had the title put in her name as well as his, so it was legally made her property, too, in exchange for the financial benefit of saving on his car insurance.

His sole heir (only child) benefits indirectly by whatever money was saved in this arrangement.

I'm curious. Is there so little to inherit that the car has significant value or is this just a question, with fairness and legality in mind?
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