Follow
Share

Does the battery use lot of electric? She can't use cane anymore, but wants to go out. would a regular wchair light and portable to good. i don't know what to do about this.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Use a reputable DME company that also does other custom rehab equipment, look for their staff having national certification suchas RESNA, NAMES, ATP or ATS after their names. They should then hlpe you select somethng appropriate for your mom's skills, environment, terrain, and goals for enhanced mobility. Scooters are mostly lighter and more transportable, plus more maneuverable and good for people who are weak but can still get up and down a lot. Standard power chairs are heavier but can be tied down for van or speical bus transport, and can provide more trunk support and are generally a little more stable, less likely to ever tip over, though that can happen with either. The decision is very individual, or at least it should be!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Having at one time leased a spot next to a Scooter Store I know their story. Their demise was pretty quick- having about 150 federal agents heading into their Texas HQ and shutting them down wasn't a good day for them. The government didn't care for the "free" scooters they were mostly promising people. Medicare audited them and wanted close to 100 million back. Hoveround is still around- although I think they just got audited and told they need to pay many millions back (the actual amount is debatable so I suspect they will work things out). .
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I'd like to give the walker option another push. As MaryKathleen said - perhaps finding a way to increase moms endurance is a good idea before purchasing a scooter or motorized chair. If it is at all possible - and moms dr should be able to advise you - increased endurance can lead to increased mobility which in all likelihood will keep mom more independent but more than that - healthy both physically and mentally longer. My mom participates irregularly in the wheelchair exercise class they hold daily at her facility. I wish she would participate more often as not only does it help her mobility, endurance and range of motion, it's gets her socializing with peers. And, unfortunately my mom now tries to get us to let her rely on wheelchair instead of her walker - almost takes an act of God to get her to walk around under her own steam - we do try to get her to wheel her own chair vs having us push her around all the time. Better than nothing, I guess.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

If you answered the questions on age, health problems, and I missed it forgive me. I wonder why she lacks endurance. Would physical therapy and exercise help? I belong to a gym that has senior exercise programs. There are a couple of people who can't move much but they are building up strength and endurance. One lady has a chair beside her for her oxygen tank. She keeps on trucking,,, Would something like that help your mother with her endurance. Have you talked to her physician about her lack of endurance?
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

hello everyone. my mother lacks endurance so a walker is out at this point. i am searching for a medicare approved lightweight power wheelchair or scooter. what are some medicare approved companies. what is name of your scooter and how did you get it. thank you everyone for all answers. keep them coming.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

How about a Rollator walker?
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I have a very cool walker, it is more expensive than the ones Medicare pays for but for me it is worth every penny. I wish I could post a picture of it. I think the company is DRIVE. I have back problems and I can lean on it and it relieves my back pain. When I go ShopPing (Capitals are how grandchildren pronounce it) with the Grandkids, I need to use the seat while the girls are looking through stores. The back is adjustable and that is very important for me. I do think it is vitally important to be able to use the handbrake. You just push it down to lock and lift up to release. It folds up easy and I can lift it into the back of my Dodge Magnum easily. I had it pinstriped for decoration. Guys like it because it looks more manly. I am a gal. If she is very overweight they do have wider versions of most walkers. Another thought, maybe you can get a used motorized chair or scooter. I think it should be a last resort because of what the others have said about muscle strength and balance.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My mom has a motorized scooter that is made from aluminum and is very light weight, so much so that when she first got it she could lift it up and put it in the back of her SUV herself. Not so much anymore, but she often can get someone in a parking lot to help her. I don't know the brand name, but just google lightweight scooters. The battery will go 6 miles on one charge (she has tested it on the Pinellas Trail). It is more expensive than most scooters, but has been well worth the investment. Easily stolen though because it is so portable, so be sure it lock and insure it.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Rainmom, my Mom tried my Dad's rolling walker with hand brakes and she just couldn't control the brakes.... now that I look back, my Mom couldn't use a bicycle with hand brakes, either.

My Dad is really good at putting on the brakes, and locking the brakes when he goes to sit down on the walker. And locking the walker when getting in and out of the car so it doesn't roll down the driveway into the street. I also sit on the walker to get closer to talk to him, too :)
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

On the handbreak issue - ALL my parents doctors, PTs, OTs, rehabs, home health care providers were forever trying to get them to utilize the handbreaks - which work somewhat similar to handbreaks on a bicycle - neither had an incident because of the non-use, but I pretty much consider that a small miracle! I, on the other hand did. I often sat on the seat of the walker as I could pull it up close to where my parent was sitting and we could talk without yelling to hear. Anyhoo - I turned and went to sit down and the damn thing rolled back and I fell flat on my well cushioned behind. Had this happen to either parent it probably would have resulted in an ER visit instead of a bruised bottom and wounded pride. So yes, while it may seem like a minor function and even a given that they could manage the breaks, it is an important consideration.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

GardenArtist, I was wondering why I hadn't seen all those commercials for the Hoveround Scooters. Thanks for the update.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

HelpUs, the issue isn't so much which is better as it is which is more appropriate for mother.

A rollator, which is a rolling walker with a seat and basket beneath, is more sturdy than a walker but it does require the ability to use a handbrake. It's also heavier than a walker and harder (at least for me) to get in a car because it doesn't completely collapse and takes up literally all the space between the front and back seats.

A scooter can be fitted into the trunk of a car, but I found that I had to take everything out of the trunk and put it in the back seat to get the scooter into the trunk. Getting it out is even harder because of the need to bend over the trunk and lean in - it puts a lot of stress on the back. The battery is heavy.

However, if you have a station wagon or SUV or vehicle with a hatchback and flat trunk, it's a lot easier to maneuver.

There is no way of telling how much electricity a battery uses without some means of specifically monitoring the output for charging it as well as how long it lasts.

I'm not sure if Medicare will pay for a scooter though; there are Hoverhound scooters which are also available; however, there was a federal crackdown on these and if I recall correctly the FBI was involved in a raid of the headquarters - I don't remember all the issues but I believe there was abuse by the company selling them in getting Medicare to pay for them. I'm not sure what the status of them is now.

The drawback with a wheelchair is that it doesn't allow the individual to use his/her legs in the same way as a walker or rollator, thus allowing the legs to atrophy (absent other exercise). The lightweight ones I've seen aren't as supportive in the seat area, but they're easier to manage simply for short transit.

Wheelchairs are not particularly comfortable; you'd likely need a gel pad or some other support for the seat as well as the back because they're no inherent padding.

Without knowing more about your mother's condition, it's hard to say which type of assistance might be the best for her. This is an issue you could ask a therapist if one is involved, or even one of her doctors.

I would recommend though that you ask an orthopedic doctor or someone who's older; one of the youngsters who we no longer see was insistent that a cane was best, but my father found a walker to be much more stable and helpful for him. The youngster doctor hadn't much experience with older folks, I think.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

I have no experience with scooters or motorized wheelchairs. The progression my parents went was cane to four-wheel walker as freqflyer stated. Both did very well with the walkers for quite some time - also really liked the type that came with a seat and cubbie under the seat for toting things around. Neither parent got the hang of the handbreak but never lost control of their walker. That said - if you are determined to have something motorized, the scooters by far out numbered the motorized wheelchairs in the retirement community where my parents lived - so I'd assume there's something to that. Please keep in mind a walker will keep your mom up and moving under her own steam which is good for her. In both my parents case they have/had both walker and regular wheelchair - we would use the chair in cases where we had distances to go or needed to move at a quicker pace.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

Regarding Medicare paying for scooters or powered wheelchairs. https://www.medicare.gov/Pubs/pdf/11046.pdf
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Well, first you have the MD write a Rx for a wheelchair. Power chairs are pretty heavy, try and lift one yourself. The store will fit her to a chair proper for her height and weight. An OT will train her on safe use. Medicare covers 80% of the rental, you pay the rest.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

helpus, please give us more information... such as what are your Mom's health issues? Does she have memory issues?

Normally a person will go from a cane to using a walker, has she tried that? There are some really nice rolling walkers that have wheels, hand brakes [if Mom is coordinated enough to know how to use hand brakes], a basket to carry things, and a seat so she can sit down when tired. My Dad has one and he really likes using it :)
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

she is not in dementia. she uses scooter at store and does ok. i want to know a medicare covered motorized wchair or scooter for her at home and to go out and that isn't too heavy to lift. thank you
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

If she cannot manage a cane due to loss of coordination, she will not know how to use a wheelchair. Dementia in a wheelchair, especially a powered one, will result in collisions and injury. Insurance does not cover the damage or injury to others.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.