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I'm trying to find a site for my mom whose caring for my grandmother who will not cooperate with anyone concerning anything. She wrote a letter on what she wants done but won't let no one see it until she pass. She doesn't have life insurance and will not discuss life insurance with anyone and states she's not ready to talk about it. My grandmother is 84 yrs old, its really hard to find insurance companies at her age in Missouri yet alone its expensive. Could someone please send me a copy of the the forms of Power of Attorney/ guardianship for (well being, financial, durable, executive of estate etc.) PLEASE I need help.

Thank you,
Alita

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The website LegalZoom.com has forms of POA (both financial and medical) that may help.
A guardianship is a court procedure, and there is no form available for that. You would need to hire an attorney to assist you through the court hearing, etc.
The same for an estate: an attorney is almost always needed to file the proper forms with the local probate court.
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At her age she will not be able to obtain term life insurance. I believe the break off age is 80. We just went thru that with my mother-in-law. You can take out a burial policy, usually through a funeral home of your choice, for as much as you want $10K should be plenty, and make monthly payments, if her net worth will not cover it. Check around, that's what we did. It takes an attorney to get a binding P O A. If the elderly person is not cooperative, it can get complicated, competency hearing, etc. Good luck
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I used many sites for POA and durable POA for my mom. I actually googled "POA forms" - did a lot of cut and paste and made my own; adding more than was actually necessary, just to be on the safe side. For example - I was on the deed to her home with "or" so legally either of us could sell it; I was on her bank accounts with "or", so I could deposit or withdraw, but I added in the POA & Durable POA that I had authority to act on her home and bank accounts - basically to cover EVERY angle. Among many other issues I saw posted in the examples online. Dad passed away and I'm an only child so there would never be anyone to contest the POA; and mom wanted to make sure I would be able to handle everything. Remember a POA is used while the person is competent and a Durable POA kicks in when the person is deemed incompetent but must be signed when they are competent - so you really need to have both now. Both documents had to be notarized and the notary questioned mom to make sure that she was aware of what she was signing - basically giving me legal rights to act in her behalf for anything and also made sure she was competent to sign both. The notary (worked in a rehab/nursing) stated that "you really had a good lawyer draw up these documents". I said "why" and she said well I have to initial every page as does your mom and the pages are numbered #1 of 8, #2 of 8, etc. She said "its very rare that she sees that but it should really be done all the time". I told her I drew up the paperwork myself but since I was used to writing grants for the government, I covered every angle. To me it just made sense also - if the person and notary just signed the last page, then a dishonest person could just change the other page contents. I always play the "what if" game and wanted things not to be left to question - did it as I plan on doing my own - so that I know exactly what is in there and it can never be changed or questioned. I used that POA numerous times - going into contract for mom's assisted living, disputing bills with rehab, etc. - just things that I was able to do that made it easier for mom because she didn't have to deal with those things. An attorney's signature is not required. Or as posted above you could try Legal Zoom. Also many office stores (Office Max, Office Depot) sell basic forms that may give you some guidance. Also make sure she has a living will and health care surrogate form. Good luck.
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I am NOT an attorney but merely an average person that has experience taking care of several relatives (father, uncle, sister, etc.) through the past 20 years.

While it is easy to get POA and other legal forms online, sometimes utilizing an attorney is worth the cost/effort. Not all POA's are created equal...in my case, my mother, my aunt and myself all have established living trusts for ourselves. Each of us has a POA that is executable ONCE WE SIGNED IT. Another words, no one has to declare me "incapacitated" before they can act as my POA (in my case, my daughter). While this may seem "scary" for some people, in our case (where we trust our appointee fully) that they don't have to take the extra steps (and often futile) to be declared "incapacitated".
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I'm wondering why you want to buy life insurance for someone who's 84 years old? Naturally, insurance is cheaper the younger and healthier you are when you buy it. For your grandmother, insurance would, of course, be crazily expensive.

If you go to Legal Zoom, or one of the other do-it-yourself law sites, they often have a 'try it' offer where you can get the first form free. I used a POA from Legal Zoom and. when I later visited a lawyer for another matter, she gave it her blessing as covering all the bases. Be advised that, when you're filling out the form on line, it has LOTS of options. Each is accompanied by an explanation. Be sure to read them thoroughly.
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I have a couple friends who helped me write up a POA for my Mother and Mother-in-law several years ago. One friend was a legal secretary and the other was a notary. My POAs cover medical and financial and I didn't need an attorney. All I needed was a notary, so check around with local notaries because, many have fabricated their own documents and they just fill in the blanks. So, your only problem it seems is getting her to sign it. If she does not have insurance and you don't have the money for a funeral, some cities and/or states will cremate your loved-one for a minimal fee, or for free in some instances. You should talk to someone in the coroner's office for information. There is also the Catholic Life Services and other Church organizations that will help people when needed. I think one of the other posts has info on where you can get blank forms or you can google just about anything these days. Good Luck!
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Thanks everyone, this is getting stressful for me. I lost my mother in-law last year and everything was all taken care of and Vitas were excellent supporters. My Grandfather passed suddenly and my Grandmother is still getting around but you can tell she's getting tired. I thought my aunts and uncles had made sure all was taken care of but nothing.

I figured a lawyer will be needed because I have an uncle w/Cerebral Palsy whose in the household as well, this is why I was seeking information for guardianship.

Thanks again for your help, advise and suggestions. This was helpful.
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I actually found a lady in our community who is not an attorney that is able to file guardianship. Maybe check with your local courts to see if someone like that lives in your area.
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Find a geriatric case manager who will be able to help with many things.
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And have training on how to work compassionately and patiently with elders.
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