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Actually I live in Osceola county and I'm planning to bring my dad with me due to the sickness is progressing. My mom is his actual caregiver but she's aging too with her own illnesses and is becoming hard for her to handle the care. He's at the point that he wants to be on bed most of the time and not wanting to eat.

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If he is bed bound and not wanting to eat, I second terryjack1's suggestion about contacting hospice and having him evaluated for that program. It can be extremely helpful as you decide what care to provide and what behaviors you should encourage. Should you try to get him interested in getting up part of the time? Should you push food? Beverages? If your father is in his final leg of the journey, hospice can really be extremely helpful. They have made this journey with people many times and can help you know what to expect.
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contact hospice, both his dementia and Parkinson will only worsen and he will continue to decline. I'm so sorry he is ill. You can also contact your local area agency on aging, they have in home programs and caregiver programs. Getting a power of attorney would be good if there is not already one. Good luck
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See a lawyer immediately , get POA in place as soon as possible. It will surprise you how fast it comes when they can't sign their own name on important documents.See a lawyer versed in the health issues ( Dementia, Alz) , not just any lawyer and he will take you through it step by step. So many think they can save money by bypassing the lawyer but a good lawyer will save you thousands. .
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Don't worry about your dad not being able to step over the tub wall. I sponge bathe my husband, and I have established a routine whereby I do him in bits and pieces, very successfully I might add. I did it this way with people who had dementia and whom I took care of for five years before I had to quit my job and stay home to care for my own husband, who had been diagnosed with dementia. There is no law in the land that requires a caregiver to have a patient step over a tub wall. Sponge bathing is not only just as effective, it can be very soothing.
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If you haven't been highly involved in his care, I'd start with a chat with his doctor(s) so you'll know the extent of what you're thinking of doing.
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First of all, contact his medical insurance. I never thought of contacting our medical insurance until our daughter urged me to do it. Lo and behold, our benefits allow for a "home health care medical provider" to come in for no more than a total of 8 hours a day and for no more than a total of 35 hours a week, no co-pay! I was astounded. The rep also gave me several numbers to call for "home health care medical providers," and she told me that this cannot be put through until they first have my hubby's doctor's okay, which I know he will give. I can no longer take my husband to his doctor, so now he has a "house call" doctor that our medical insurance also provides. Have you looked into all of this? I would if I were you. Good luck!
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Do not move Dad in with you, unless you are prepared to pay for 24-hr in home care. Nobody, not even SuperWoman, can provide 24/7/365 care for an Alz with Parkinson patient. Either requires complete high level of 5 nursing home care, or 24 hr in-home (and your home in latter case will have to be like a nursing home--read elsewhere on all.that is needed). The county is not going to retrofit your bathroom, for example, to accommodate someone who cannot step over the tub wall.
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Call the Osceola County office of the aging for help BEFORE you move them.
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