Follow
Share

Not just for property.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
I strongly advise against it. We went through that last year when my husband and his brother downloaded a DURABLE POA form and after much fighting and arguing they finally got my mother-in-law to agree. They went to one of her banks and got it notarized. Then guess what, the next day my brother-in-law took it to another bank to test it and it got rejected because it's not notarized in that bank! They then notified my mother-in-law about this and he is now locked out of her account from that bank completely (before he had online access). All the trouble for nothing! Every bank has its own POA form and they won't accept anything else, at least in California! Get an attorney. That would be my advice!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

You could get it on nolo - make sure it's right for your state. A local attorney fixed one for us and charged $50.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

tom411, just curious if you plan to fill it out yourself or another relative. Please be very careful when filling out any type of legal documents without the help of an Elder Law attorney, one misplaced word could make the Power of Attorney read differently than what you have planned.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

In NC you go to the Clerk of Court web site you live in and down load it. Probably different in each area. Do a Google search.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.