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My mother is 86 and have alot of problems, she is in nursing home right and nurse suggested getting POA. I have no idea how to start. Please help direct me

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MACinCT,
Re: Scope of Nursing Practice:
Yes, a nurse's role as an advocate for the patient requires that she obtain informed consent from the patient. The nurse is often responsible for asking the patient to sign the forms, which would include legal liability for the nurse and her employer (the facility) if the nurse obtained a signature from someone not able to understand informed consent.

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Why is a nurse asking you this. Is it really in her scope of practice?
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You will need documents for making
1) financial decisions for your Mom; and
2) Medical decisions (her wishes ahead of time).

If she is receiving Social Security, the Dept. of Soc. Security may assign you to be her "rep-payee" for receipt of those funds to pay her bills.

However, the nurse's immediate concern may be the medical power of attorney for Mom's healthcare-to advocate for her. Because with the new HIPPA privacy laws, the doctors cannot tell you about her.

If you feel this is going to be too much for you, is there someone else you both trust to be DPOA, medical POA, and rep-payee for social security? Family?

There is a steep learning curve, but you can do it-a lay person can do it.
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Check with your County Department on Aging or even a local senior center. They may be able to refer you to an attorney who will do a POA for minimal cost. I know my mothers attorney volunteered one day a week at the senior center in the neighborhood where his office was located and would do basic services at no cost.
You may find an attorney who would be willing to go to where your mother is. 
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There are do it yourself forms you can download off the internet but I would only go that route as a last resort. If you must use them do your research carefully so you both understand what a POA can and can't do, and be sure to have mom's competence certified and the forms properly witnessed and notarized.
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I'll talk to the nurse, she was the one suggested it. So she needs to do this, she can't walk right now, so what should I do?
Her short term memory is not good ,but her long term is ok
Nether one of us has money for help.
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POA isn't something you "get", it is something you must be given by your mother. She would need to see a lawyer and sign paperwork appointing you to act on her behalf (and according to her wishes) when she can no longer act for herself. Is she still competent to do that?
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