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My mother is bored. She's 86, beginning to middle stage Alzheimer's I think, still somewhat independent, but shouldn't live alone and we moved in. I don't have someone at home to keep her busy during the day every day, she doesn't need that yet. My husband is there most of the time to keep an eye on her if she was to fall or has any problems. I think this disease is not letting her keep herself busy (and one of the reasons I wanted to quit my job to stay home with her to take her places, etc, but have decided not). Recently she called one of her old co-worker friends to see if she knew anyone hiring. That friend told me mom thought she had just moved back to OK (which was about 20 years ago) So that friend suggested she take an art class, as she was doing in her retirement. The local senior center is too far in my opinion for her to travel, and she won't let my husband drive her, and since her memory is somewhat an issue, they probably don't want her there. So I wondered if there's a service that would come to our house once a week and teach an art class to her, or do an art project. Where could I search? Is there such a service?

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Check out some Teepa Snow YouTube videos to give you some tips on talking with your mom.

I like your idea of an art instructor for the personal interaction. Try local universities to see if you can find any students who might be recommended.

Also to see if she might actually be interested in painting you might pick her up some paints and canvases and brushes. The small roller brushes are good. Get her a “safe” place set up and see what happens.
Since she likes contemporary work she might try painting some small squares in colors she likes. Sometimes used canvases can be found at thrift stores for a couple of bucks that she can paint over and will have more texture when the existing paint is covered.
You could get her a video to watch with techniques or just let her get going.
If she likes the job idea you could have her do a series of squares in colors that would work in your office or kitchen or laundry room or hall way or to brighten or lighten a bookshelf. Something that would perk up the area and she wouldn’t feel like you were just giving her busy work.
Perhaps take her around to a few galleries to see if she can get inspired. But don’t expect her to remember instruction. 
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Thank you all. I need to call the senior center to see what they can suggest. GardenArtist, I bought mom an adult coloring book and color pencils and pens and she's not shown much interest in it, I don't know, maybe she needs me to show her how to do it. My mom likes anything modern, my dad was an architect, so their/her style was/is somewhat contemporary. She was interested in stain glass art at one time and jewelry making. I thought I would try her silk flower arranging as a "job" to do when she was done with the job I gave her to do right now (shredding architectural plans from my father's business.) I thought the silk flowers would be good for her to make something as cemetery decorations. I'm going to talk with her this weekend if I get a chance to see what she wants to do. To be honest, it's been difficult talking to her, she gets angry with me if I contradict her or bring up that her Alzheimer's is tricking her (cause she doesn't believe there is anything wrong with her), so I keep my mouth shut. I don't want her to drive any more than she has to, but I can't tell her that, she says when I tell her to not do something that I'm not her mother or stop being being a *itch. (then she laughs, but she's also serious) I've suggested to her about going someplace like adult day care where there is daily activity (but didn't say it was daycare, just a senior center) and told her she could help other people with whatever they need (as a job) and she refused, said she didn't want to take care of old people. I may need to get her in the car and take her to see if she likes it at the senior center and if the center is okay with her asking the same questions over and over and future unknown actions she may do.
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The local cities and senior centers around here always offer all kinds of classes for seniors: art, knitting, low-impact aerobics, painting, etc. Many of the instructors teaching these classes are always looking for more clients. You can visit the classes and ask if they would come to teach your mother. I bet some of them would.

Also, if you know of some families that home school their children, you can ask them for a list of 'vendors' they use. These 'vendors' are businesses or individuals that teach all types of subjects including arts. Many of them will come to the clients' houses to teach.

There are also free magazines that you usually find at pediatric dentist/doctor offices. These magazines have tons of ads for classes. Call and see if they will come to your house.

Good luck.
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I can finally access the samples now.

SandwichedGirl, can you give me some ideas of things that your mother likes, and I find some good samples to color so you can get an idea if these might interest your mother? I get the free samples, which creates a wide variety of the high caliber art that's available.

There are wild and domestic animals, florals, wilderness, mandalas and more. There used to be some charming homes including Victorians, but they haven't been included in samples for years.
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Great ideas from Garden Artist. May I add seeking a day care program that would have activities throughout the day. some of the ones in my area provide transportation. Some Visiting nurse assoc. offer volunteer companion visits --- perhaps it would be someone with some artistic talents. Having said that, the memory care facility that I used for my Mom had scout groups come in to do craft projects. I would say 90% of the residents couldn't follow ANY of the instructions.
Being alone all day isn't much fun. Can you bring in someone for short periods of time to act as a companion? A student at a local college studying in the medical field? A stay at home Mom who has time during the day while the children are in school? Someone from a church group ? Etc.
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Sorry, I can't get to the samples; I'll try later and let you know when I've P'M'ed you with a link.
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Contact the senior center and see if it has a small bus or "paratransit" bus that can pick her up and bring her home. Some centers have this, and sometimes the buses also take people shopping to specific grocery stores. This would address the transportation issue. Perhaps your husband could accompany her on trips until she becomes used to the bus and the strangers.

I think she could benefit from being with others, dementia notwithstanding, unless you feel differently. She doesn't necessarily need to interact with them, and if she's not violent, I'm not sure if the dementia would be an issue (see next paragraph; the people at those classes had dementia but just focused on their artwork).

I watched a PBS program on art for people with dementia, but unfortunately I don't recall the name or where it was held. I believe it was either at a senior center, or some other similar location.

I just googled "art classes for seniors" and got a LOT of hits; you might try that as well. That might be a way to determine if she could attend classes, and/or inquire about someone who could teach her at home.

Another alternative is to buy some high quality coloring books, with simple designs, buy a good set of crayons, watercolor paints or colored pencils (these are better as they can create more depth in the design) and let her work with them when she wants to. It might avoid the issue of being unable to understand any instructions, although they're minimal. It's essentially choose your project and start coloring or painting.

Check your private messages in about 1/2 hour; I'm sending you a link for examples of some high quality art. You could even save and print out the pages and let her try some; it will give you an idea if this could be a successful endeavor.
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I also googled "art classes for dementia patients" and learned that the Alzheimer's Assn. has classes. I would contact them as well; they too may offer individual sessions. There are also a lot of hits for this topic.

Are you using music therapy? Check out Dance for PD. Not withstanding the fact that she doesn't have PD, the program has phenomenal success in using music as therapy.
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