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My father is 91 and lost our mother a year ago. He is unsteady on his feet, yet still tries doing a million things around is rural, country home. There is so much to do, he has left things over the years fall apart. And the things he wants to get done are not for him to try to be doing. But he thinks he can. He fell and broke his hip 5 years ago. Then after my mom passed was on a little ladder in his bathroom (he hasn't had a working shower in over 2 years) trying to do repairs and fell from that. He broke his arm. He still lives alone. My brother lives across the yard but works 10 hour days and in the last 4 months has for what ever reason grown distant from him. He hardly comes over to check on him or help with any thing. I can only do so much. I try so hard. But on many of the harder tasks my father won't allow me to help. My son has moved away and has his own job now, so he can't help. My husband is unable to either. My father finds it hard to let other people help him, let alone if he has to pay for it. He is a big penny pincher. But I'd do any thing to get someone to come and help with tasks and carpentry work for him. Is there any way AT ALL I can find someone in my area that can provide help of this sort for him? It would mean the world to me!!
Also, how can you be sure and trust care such as this? Is there background checks done? As much as I want help for my father, I worry about all the things you hear on the News about elderly people being robbed and hurt by people they thought were caring for them.

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Look in his local yellow pages under "plumbers, carpenters, etc." That's what I did for my mother if I couldn't do the job myself (I had to move in with her from my home in Maryland and live with her in her home in Massachusetts). My husband fixed a lot of things, too, until he had to return to our home in Maryland.
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It's too bad he has "let things fall apart." He could have taken care of them when he was younger on weekends.
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Yes, sadly, they become belligerent. My legally blind, 94 y.o. mother grabbed a vacuum cleaner from me forcibly saying "I can, too, vacuum." Of course, she almost fell on her tush, but I caught her.Can he go into an AL?
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+blannie , wow...I knew BBB was like a paid good-ol'-boy's club, but had not heard that about Angie's list. Pity!
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Angie's List is no longer very reliable. Contractors/service providers can pay to get on top of the listings. So I wouldn't use them...
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In addition to the above good suggestions, I'd add: maybe checking online using Angie's list.
Also, once you have a list of possible contractors to do repairs, check them out online on Yelp...might find comments given by people both pro and con.
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If you get quotes I suggest always getting them in writing and as specific as possible. Also if you can get each job itemized so if he only decides to have two out of four done you know how much it will cost. You can check different bureaus and look for reviews online too.
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This is a really tough one but here is a list of things that might help. First, see if you can get a list of things that need done and prioritize them in terms of importance. I suggest safety issues and protecting his home should be at the top. Many handypersons have a minimum number of hours they will work. Some as low as one or two. Some want at least a four hour minimum.

Everyone says to get someone that is licensed, bonded, and insured. If you can get all three that is great. I assume your dad has homeowner's insurance. Check with the agent about what would happen if someone uninsured, etc. got hurt etc, or did damage to your dad's home while trying to repair it.

Also it is suggested to see copies or get information about license number, insurance, etc. since people could lie about it or forget to keep it up. However, sometimes a person gets desperate and just needs help asap and doesn't fiddle around with all this stuff. Sources of handypersons could be local papers, phone books, bulletin boards, neighbors, local hardware store, etc. Some churches have ministries where they help older people with maintenance, etc.

The problem with free help is that beggars can't be choosers so it is hard to specify always how you want it done if you aren't paying. Another thing, hopefully your dad isn't known for keeping a safe in his home, money under the mattress or bragging about how much he saved. Keeping valuable out of sight and being there when he gets help should help some.

If you can get some people to come out and give quotes on a stack of jobs that would help. Sometimes if you purchase materials that helper needs before he does the work that saves time and money. I have had people on well known lists lie to me and do terrible job. You rarely find a perfect helper. Some can be cheap but messy, some that are good are booked out forever. Finding a good handyperson is as tough or tougher than finding a good spouse.

Once you have some ideas maybe you can run them by the brother that isn't helping to see what he thinks of the cost, person, etc. Maybe he will say that is crazy, I will help dad. Or maybe if dad agrees not to criticize while I work I will help.
Maybe your brother honestly doesn't care about your dad or helping him. Hard to tell, just put one foot in front of the other and hopefully it will work out. Try to convince dad that buy doing repairs he is saving money by protecting his investment.
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Contact Habitat for Humanity or Christmas in Action, or call the local Senior Centers and ask if they have a list of handyman or handywoman helpers.
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