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Such as telephone bills, cable bills, insurance bills.etc. or is it just the financial accounts? Also, would the doctors' bills be titled in the name of the Guardian?

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If you come up with a proper working strategy that actually works, there may not be any need for someone to take over your financial affairs if you know how to set everything up correctly should you become incapacitated. For instance, leaving all of your money in the bank is a good start. From there, set up online auto bill pay to have all of your bills come out automatically on the date you choose. Another smart move is to use your ATM card at the checkout to pay for purchases. If you set up automatic transfers however often you choose for the amount you choose, you can set up automatic transfers however often you choose for the amount you choose, you can leave the rest of your money in a savings account for safekeeping and only have what you need on your card. This is a good working strategy if you don't carry cash. It's much easier to swipe a card then it is to count cash and worry about running short. It's more convenient to have what you actually need on your card and don't deal with cash only places. Cash can easily get lost or stolen, and cards are much easier to keep track of. Some people say card readers are hard to get, but card readers are much easier to get these days because you can even get one that plugs into a mobile device. In fact, a friend told me tonight there's a new app out that will allow her phone to be a card reader, real easy to get a card reader these days and leave all of your money in the bank. As long as you leave all of your money in the bank and operate by an all automated strategy, there should be no need for anyone to ever have their hands in your bank account for no reason whatsoever
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In IL if we get a divorce I can not be his guardian, but a family member could be. There is at least yearly paperwork that needs to be done on things paid for I believe, when they go to court. . Having a guardian is not cheap, there is a cost per mile and per hour. The Eldercare attorney said that the guardian can have it that I can not talk with his DR, they would handle that. NO way in h3ll would I allow that, but she did mention most guardians let family members go to the DR with the spouse. The whole thing just made me very upset and that I could lose control of things with his care if we were divorced .This was 2 yrs ago I checked into guardians.
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There comes a time when minors, senior citizens, or disabled persons might need someone to manage their money. In these cases, a guardian will be appointed by the court to control guardianship of the persons accounts. While you want to think that every one who is appointed a guardian of an account is trustworthy and will manage the accounts ethically and wisely, that is not always the case. That is why there are rules governing the control of guardian accounts. From who has access to the account, to who owns it, and how money is spent, courts monitor these accounts.
Children and Guardianship Accounts

Children are not legally allowed to open a bank account or manage their own money in an account. Sometimes a parent or guardian might jointly open an account for a child to save money for college or to just help to teach the child about saving. In this case the parent is the actual owner of the account and has control over the money, and may do what they wish with the funds.

This is different then a guardianship account. With a guardianship account the money does belong to the child. The guardian of the account manages the money for a child but doesn’t not have any ownership over that money. The most common reason for a child to have an account with guardianship is that the parents are deceased and have left money or property for the child and someone, the guardian, needs to control that account until the child is of legal age.
Elderly or Disabled Individuals and Guardianship Accounts

Sometimes adults do not have the physical or mental capacity to manage their finances and a guardian needs to be appointed. As with children, the guardian does not gain any ownership of the persons finances, they just manage the account. The court chooses an appropriate guardian for someone who has been deemed unable to manage their finances.
The Rules and How it all Works

As mentioned, the guardian of an account controls the funds and must report all receipts and disbursements to the court on a periodic basis. The guardian handles the account but had no ownership of the account, meaning the money or property in the account.

All guardianship accounts have a beneficiary or a “ward”, usually a child, elderly, or disabled individual.
The guardian of the account can not appoint a beneficiary of the account. It other words can not change who the account is for and who receives the disbursements.
In order to open an guardianship account, the guardian must show a certified copy of a court order appointing them guardian of an individuals account.
If an individual can no longer serve as guardian of an account, because of death or some other reason, the court will appoint a new guardian for the account.
Because the guardian does not own the funds in the account, the money can not be used to settle the debt of the guardian – meaning it can’t be garnished or siezed.
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As for charge accounts, I don't know. However, for bank accounts, I would think the guardian would have to be on as a trustee for security purposes. If you have a trustee on your bank account, that trustee then has full access to that bank account whereas they would otherwise not have. Without being a named trustee on a bank account, the bank cannot and will not give access to anyone who's not named on that bank account. This helps protect each customer from fraud.
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NO they are not. They remain in the Ward's name.
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I don't think so. The bills are still the patient's bills, but things are likely addressed to "X", Guardian of "patient Y".
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