Follow
Share

Do you ask her to text or call you so you are aware of the shift change among aides? I have asked our live in aide to do this and she usually does not for some reason. I am not sure if she is offended by it for some reason or not but it is the only way I know how to track who is on duty at any given time. We discuss the schedule in advance but oftentimes weather, trains, etc can change plans for a covering aide's arrival so I like to confirm who is where without having to stop what I am doing at work and make phone calls. Any thoughts about this? I have not had this problem with any other aide and I am baffled by it. I am going to have a heart to heart talk with her but was curious what others are doing.

Find Care & Housing
My mom doesn’t have a live in caregiver, but 4 caregivers cover her 24/7 care. I know their basic schedule, but I do NOT have them call me when they switch it up because of something coming up in their personal life. I’ve told them repeatedly that I don’t care whose there & when, as long as someone is there. I’ve NEVER had a problem and I think they like the freedom. They do have time sheets they fill out & most of the time Mom can still tell on them.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to mollymoose
Report

You are the employer so it is your responsibility to implement a proper time keeping system not hers. Asking her to contact or text you would not be compliant with FLSA timekeeping requirements. One employee, who is not management, cannot legally report or change another person's hours. You are required to give a written copy of the policy to the employee and keep a signed one for yourself. The records must be kept for a certain amount of time, last I knew New York was 6 years rather than the 3 the DOL requires.

The easiest way I found to deal with record keeping requirements when not on site was to make a timecard template in excel, print them off and have them faxed to me weekly. An employee had to sign and date as verification of hours worked for payroll purposes. Their signature was protection for the company if they ever filed a wage complaint.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to tacy022
Report

I see no problem if her shift is covered but she needs to tell you when she won't be working.

Don't be afraid to ask. You are her employer or at least the payroll clerk. Its being responsible and as a professional she needs to give you the courtesy of telling you when she is taking off. All she needs to do is make sure her shift is covered.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to JoAnn29
Report

caregivingstuff, are you hiring caregivers not through an Agency or through an Agency? If not through an Agency, I can fully understand the need to make sure someone is at the house at all times. That alone is a lot of stress on yourself.

I used an Agency, and it was the Agency's responsibility to get all the caregivers to arrive on their shift. I didn't need to oversee that. If a caregiver had called out, immediately the Agency would schedule another person to fill in.

Oh, I never had a live-in caregiver because I felt that person would be doing the work of 3 full-time caregivers every day, thus that person will eventually crash and burn. Plus there is the expense of having to have "workman's comp" insurance for any caregiver not hired through an Agency. And doing payroll unless you use a check processing company.

Caregiving can be so complex.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to freqflyer
Report
JoAnn29 Dec 26, 2018
But she says shift change between aides so there is more than one.
(0)
Report
We use a registry so they do not operate like a regular agency tracking hours and so forth. It is up to me.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to caregivingstuff
Report

Ask a Question

Subscribe to
Our Newsletter