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My MIL has these outbursts once in a while havent noticed any particular trigger but can see her agitation escalating.I believe it is just frustration not remembering things and not having control over her home anymore because m Husband and I moved in with her 5 yrs ago at the very beginning of her illness. After this last stroke in August we are both home full time because she requires 24 /7 care. Her out bursts are always directed at me whether I am in the room or not and lately she doesnt always recognize me.We are trying some meds so maybe that is the answer I dont know. I dont really know if that is any particlar stage of the illness,I have not read that specifically. My thoughts and Prayers are with you!!
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Sudden changes can cause outbursts or shutdowns, because the brain is limited in what it can process in a short time. Fluctuations in cabin pressure during airline travel is a big risk. Frustration over simple tasks and forgetting where you put things add up and suddenly burst all at once. Usually it is later in the day, after a long struggle.
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There are a number of things that can cause anger and combative outbursts in someone with Alzheimer's Disease. If this behavior represents a sudden change in personality, you should check for a medical issue such as a urinary track infection (UTI) which manifests itself differently in someone with dementia who may not be able to express any discomfort that is normally associated with this type of infection. Once you have ruled out a medical cause, take note of what is happening in the environment just prior to the onset of the outburst. There may be something in the environment such as a spinning ceiling fan or a lawn mower outside that is triggering the behavior. The best way to deal with this behavior is to try to redirect the individual by moving to a different room or outdoors or by using something like a radio or the television or food or beverage to redirect their focus. Reassure them that they are safe and that you are there to protect them. If they are in a safe environment, give them some space and avoid confronting them.
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Yes, that is true. My mom directs her anger at me as her caretaker but within a half hour she will forget she was angry. I found if I distracted her by offering her coffee or something to eat or refocuse her toward the TV or another conversation she would just calm down right away. At the beginning of this year mom started getting very angry and actually violent. She would hit me and throw things. When she decided to threaten me with a butter knife I knew something had to be done. Her doctor prescribed Quentiapine because she wasn't sleeping from the Aricept and Namenda. That seemed to help quite a bit and now that she sleeps through the night she rarely gets real angry anymore and if she does at least she isn't violent.
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Hello,
It depends.. When my mom was in early stages of dementia she used to get very angry at me when I did not believe there were tigers and lions outside our house. I think that lasted about a couple of years. The medicines help to keep her in check. I've tried zyprexa and seroquel. The combination of seroquel and trazadone is perfect to keep her calm. Note: you will need to control constipation issues.

I know it is difficult not to get hurt and angry when you are in this situation. I've been in this close to 13 years and I still have to remind myself often that she does not know what she is doing. Walk away. Play classical music - it helps to keep calm. When my mom is really agitated I leave the music on at night. I've read that the repetition in classical music helps with dementia.

Hang in there! God Bless You :)
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I am three years into care of my mom and she is just now starting to show the loud outbursts and anger all the time directed at me in particular. The caregiver that I have during the day has told me not to take it personally, that they usually direct their anger at one person and they don't forget that!
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