Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
If this lady cannot turn herself, she will need regular turning by staff to try to avoid pressure injuries (bedsores). May also benefit from a pressure relieving air mattress (if not already). Plus the obvious of toileting issues.

Is this more like a hotel than assisted living? Is that why the staff are not trained in this area?

If you think Gramma is not being cared for adequately, please call the hospice service that came asap to report so more care can be arranged.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

"In their defense, the trip to Disney World had been planned for almost a year."
😡

So? So not going would have been a big disappointment. I would sympathise with that disappointment. It would a shame. But it wouldn't have done them any HARM.

People can't visit and comfort their loved ones! People can't invite guests to their weddings! Move house. Keep their small business running. Get their toenails cut.

We're ALL just trying to keep going.

And on top of that they were too busy with their trip to plan and organise their residents' care.

I have to say, you're a heck of a lot more forgiving than I would feel! Kudos to you for your conscientious and kindness.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

If the lady is recovering from a recent nasty fall, I'd say she needs a 2-person assist anyway - the more hands there are turning and position, the less likely you are accidentally to press on or lever a sore bit of her. Besides, many hands make light work and you'd want to keep any turning, repositioning, washing or changing as short'n'sweet as possible.

I can't believe a family that owns and lives in the same building as a residential facility has gone to Disney World. I guess the owners aren't planning to visit their charges any time soon, then?
Helpful Answer (3)
Report
SusieQ7237 Sep 28, 2020
In their defense, the trip to Disney World had been planned for almost a year. With that being said, I am still upset that she thought we could change and re-position "Gramma" alone. The nurse we have for the facility, as well as my boss, should've known better. They more than likely did, but apparently that didn't matter. I came back every night, not for some sort of praise, but to do what was right for "Gramma". Her care was left in our hands, and I did what should be done.
(1)
Report
The harsh reality is that many who would be considered a 2 person assist in a facility or by home care workers are nevertheless cared for by a single caregiver in the home, generally because most people have no other option. There are ways it can be done, using devises like positioning pillows and slide sheets can be very helpful. You can get many good tips by searching YouTube for CNA skills.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report
AlvaDeer Sep 27, 2020
What a great idea. I would also say that some of this depends on weight of patient; from my years in nursing there was so much I could do alone for smaller patients.
(0)
Report
I think that pretty much anyone who is not able to ambulate is a 2 person assist but that really depends on what you are trying to accomplish, a trained caregiver should be able to reposition or even change incontinence products independently.
I appreciated that at my mom's NH staff generally worked in 2 person teams, IMO it cut down chances for an overworked caregiver to take their frustrations out on a resident.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Do you mean that the person can't roll from one side to another, and/or "bridge" his hips?

If so, I'd have thought yes to 2:1 assistance - is there a problem?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report
SusieQ7237 Sep 27, 2020
Yes. "Gramma", as we call her, had an extremely bad fall and was rushed to the hospital, where she remained for 4 days. When she was brought back home to us, she was completely bedridden. Those of us that work there are not trained in changing or re-positioning her while she's in bed. She is unable to hold her own weight by using the bed rails. The family that owns the business live in the upstairs part of the house. Unfortunately, they had a trip to Disney World planned, and left the day after "Gramma" came home. Our Boss knew, and so did our nurse, that we were unable to do this alone. She told us she had every confidence that we could. That was not the case. I Thank God the 2 Hospice nurses that came the 2 days I was alone, were there to help me. Even her 2 daughter's, who have been sitting with her every day since she came home from the hospital, agree that their Mom needs 2 people to help do what needs to be done. I even asked both the Hospice nurses if "Gramma" was a 2 person assist, and they both said with the state she is in at the moment, that yes, she is in need of 2 people to help change and re-position her. Her 2 daughter's even asked me if I would come back in the evenings to help. I work days, but I went back every night to help my co-worker change and re-position "Gramma". My Boss does not know this, but will tomorrow when I see her. I am upset at the fact she wanted us to do this alone knowing full well we weren't able to do so. Those of us that work there are not trained for this kind of situation.
(0)
Report
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Ask a Question
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter