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She had motorized chair and was told she could not come to that facility with the chair. They provided her with a regular wheelchair that has near met her needs as she is an obese woman. This is now going on 4 years that we have been begging them for a chair that meets her needs

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Is it a normal wheelchair, 18 in across? If so, there are wide width ones. Did u sign anything to have a wc ordered. If not, check and see if Medicare will cover a wide width one.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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I can see the reasoning behind banning motorized wheelchairs. I still have my reasoning powers (I think) and you should see the mess i get into with one of Walmart's motor carts.
When they said nowhere on campus was it for outdoors as well. In my book motorized carts come under the same heading as those tiny "shopper in training grocery carts you see the little rug rats careening aound with.
oK ths granny was never a fan of small kids let loose. I kept my toddlers in harnesses tied to the shopping cart. Got lots of funny looks from older ladies with freshly blued hair. "Poor little darlings" Not one of my children ever destroyed a store is all I can say. yes one of them was asked to leave ballet class and was not allowed to go to preschool unless I stayed the whole time.
Anyway I totally agree with not confining a resident to their room just because they can't use their own chair. Many people seem to be able to get around just usein their feet in a transport chair. this lady is reported to be obese so would need a very wide chair which may be part of the problem.
I imagine that a NH can make any rules they choose about what to allow as long as they follow State guidelines for standard of care.
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Reply to Veronica91
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How many incidents would be your cut-off point, just out of interest? And what policy would you put in place to ensure that residents made certain they were having a good day before they set out?

But I am sorry that your mother is being isolated as a result of losing her chair; and I would be pushing the facility on this point. If a resident cannot move around unaided she must be assisted - it isn't acceptable for her to be left shut away in her room.
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Reply to Countrymouse
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I have to say I sympathize with the facilities, ironically many are just not designed to accommodate the needs of the people who are supposed to be living there. I suppose the architects must have imagined everyone walking unaided and then quietly slipping away after a few weeks of being totally bed bound (like the people we see in all those commercials for AL's lol), but the reality is a virtual traffic jam of walkers and wheelchairs often being propelled by people who don't have the wherewithal to yield to anyone else and all of them frail and vulnerable.
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Reply to cwillie
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I'm in the same boat. My mother recently had hers taken away after one incident. There was much pushback from the get-go. Had to go through rigorous testing at Struthers Parkinson's Institute for her to get approved. One incident and they said she can never drive it anywhere on the campus again. I have requested a copy of the "incident" as well as their policy. I feel like she is being discriminated against. With Parkinson's, one has good days and bad days. She is especially weak when she is dehydrated. Recently the Asst Liv staff sent her to the ER twice due to weakness and delirium and all they could find was dehydration. They told her that her blood was like that of a 20 year old but that she was dehydrated. I'm disgusted. Now she's back to sitting in her room all day, lonely and isolated.
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Reply to lwandrei
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Laurence75, Ontario law requires the patient to provide proof of safe operation evaluation BEFORE bringing the chair to the home AND proof of a regular maintenance contract. Battery inspection is critical to avoiding fires.
But a total ban? I would make a formal complaint.
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Reply to pamstegma
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The Assisted Living facility where my Dad had lived, I never saw a motorized wheelchair or scooter.

And I can understand why..... I've seen my Dad wheel a shopping cart in the grocery store, no way would I want him to try to drive a motorized wheelchair/scooter in a home where elders live.
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Reply to freqflyer
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A nursing home in my area had a fire caused by a power chair battery. So here in NY, the DOH is cracking down on, demanding properly maintained chairs with regular inspections and specific safety equipment. The owner must also pass a "road test" with the PT department.
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Reply to pamstegma
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Interesting question. Yeah, thanks - right? That doesn't help you much. I know in my moms IL and AL seems a large amount of the residents had scooters and scooter chairs but I never saw one at her NH. I do know there were always problems at the AL/IL with too many wanting to get on the elevator at the same time and people running over feet and ramming dining room tables - maybe that's what your moms place is trying to avoid. And of course, once they allow one - then others will demand them. Honestly, I'd be surprised if it's a law but you should be able to google that infor for your state or even call your county agency for aged/disabilities and ask. If you could get your mothers doctor to say she requires a motorized chair you may be able to push the issue.
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Reply to Rainmom
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You must call them and ask that Laurence, this is an international forum of caregivers and the likelihood of anyone here knowing the answer is very small.
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Reply to cwillie
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Are power wheelchairs allowed at Meadow Park Nursing home in London, Ont.?
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Reply to Laurence75
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In my mom NH in Connecticut, there are several patients with motorized scooters and chairs.

I would have a meeting with the facility social worker and ask for clarification. If she says it's a state reg, ask to be shown the reg. Find out if what is actually going on is that the staff thinks she lacks the cognitive capacity to use one safely.

You can request that the Nursing Home ombudsman in your area get involved in this.
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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Maggie, I haven't been in a lot of nursing homes, mostly the one my mother is at, but there are many kinds of motorized wheelchairs/mobility devices there. My mother's room mate has one. My mother could not use one, so I've never questioned what the rules are. But I can say that at least one nh in Minnesota allows motorized mobility devices. :)
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Reply to jeannegibbs
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They have to provide her with a wheelchair that meets her needs WITHIN REASON. If she had a motorised one and you can sell it then sell it and buy her a wide one. If however there is no money available and if a wide wheelchair is something she CAN sit in and a standard one is one she CANT sit in then they MUST provide a wide chair or she is being denied a fundamental right of access - I think we need to know a little more like can she actually walk at all and are they in fact trying to promote activity. I am surprised that they are offering her a standard one as they are not fit for really obese people - the frames cannot take the weight stress
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Reply to PhoenixDaughter
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I would be very surprised if there were some kind of law that said nursing homes had to allow motorized wheelchairs. I have never seen one in a nursing home, and it's not hard to understand how a few motorized wheelchairs amidst old people would be a serious hazard and open up a NH to a BIG liability problem.

If the mechanical wheelchair they are providing isn't working well enough, then use her funds or family's funds to purchase one that will. They are available on line and can be shipped directly to the NH.
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Reply to MaggieMarshall
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Viejogordo Jul 30, 2018
I hope that you never be in a nursing home, what you got to go through, the mistreatment, the bullying and this is NYC, I my self my power chair was taken from me because supposedly i used as a wepon on a security guard and i could tell dat you don't know what is to be taken away something that makes your life a little easier
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Have you spoken with the administration about this? Have you looked for another facility?

Patients generally aren't allowed to bring assistive devices from home because of liability issues, but this should have been told to you and alternate, acceptable arrangements made at the time of admission.

If this has been going on for 4 years without resolution, have you thought about looking elsewhere? And if you do, be sure to address the motorized wheelchair issue.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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