What's a good way to cope with my mom's repetition of questions or stories? She has a mild dementia at present.

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Hi. Yes, that sounds familiar. Sometimes it's funny, sometimes it's not. Do you get many breaks? It's good to have this website to vent on. I'm not with my mom all the time so it's easier for me. I hope you get some time off. Good luck!
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Thank you for the comments. All are helpful. While mom has very poor short term memory and doesn't always know she's repeating (sometimes she asks about it), I see that she still experiences a variety of feelings, embarrassment included. That's one I want to avoid. Am learning to listen (with a different outlook) and ask some questions; sometimes I learn something new! Using written answers and a white board are helpful for several questions. Taking a break is so important, and checking in with your is the best!
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First pray for grace, practice your smile, drop your shoulders,count to 10 before you answer the same question with the same answer for the 5th time and be thankful that they are there to ask those questions. Remember that this life is only practice for the upcoming one. One trick that works on certain questions is to write down the answer and put it close to them, then the next time they ask the same question, tell them to look at the paper for the answer, after a few time, you will catch them starting to ask and then looking at the paper instead. Ramember to breathe! Take an extra few minutes of time for yourself when you leave the room.
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The best thing is to respond as though it were the first time you were hearing the story. This repetition will increase as the disease progresses. The person is not aware that they are repeating themselves and bringing it to their atteniton could only cause embarrassment and/or frustration.
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Just listen. Reminiscing is a wonderful thing. And, for me, listening to the same words or questions over and over is much preferred to silent periods when nothing is being shared. And, you are indeed sharing. Try to listen attentively and comment to keep the conversation going. It is difficult at first, but remember this conversation is new to your mother. But, yes indeed patience is a requirement.
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Mine talks constantly. Starting about 11:30 am we are "going to church" , "going to the dr", where am I sleeping tonite" when are they coming to pick me up". It is always QUESTIONS, and if I try to get something done or just ignore her she only gets louder and will follow me. I do this 24/7. There are days I am about to loose my mind. She folds clothes, helps me make the bed, I can redirect her, but ten seconds later we are on it again. I take her outside when i can, get her a different prespective, something different to look at and talk about , and while we are outside she starts again. As was said earlier, patience and venting. and more venting, and then vent some more...
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I like the idea of slight detachment--listening to what she's saying but remembering that she doesn't remember! Thanks.
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WHen something repetitive is going on that's making me nuts, I make a game of either counting how many repetitions happen or tracking how little time it takes before it comes up again. This does several things -- make a game of it; keep me observing from a slightly detached position, rather than totally "in" it; and if the numbers are high I get to think "oh wow!" and if they're low I get to think "so it's not as bad as all that."
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OMG, that is so true! Have to admit that a good laugh causes the above.
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Wetting ones pants at two is cute. Wetting ones pants at 82, not so funny. ha.
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