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So we have a promise that FIL will sign both medical POA and financial POA Friday. My husband has a notary lined up to witness and stamp the papers. Mother in law will also sign but it's pretty obvious to anyone that's around her a few minutes she's got dementia . Anyway I read on here all the time the importance of getting POA. However I'm not really sure what the value of this will be. The medical one will give us an opportunity to have a say in the choices regarding their medical care but only if the spouse is unable to correct? How does the financial benefit us ? We are hoping to be able to figure out their bottom line money wise and get them hooked up with veterans benefits and Medicaid so they can go into assisted living and or memory care. Is POA going to help with these things?

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Well my husband called his dad to remind him we were coming and to make sure they had their ID ready. And guess what. They aren't ready to take such a big step. Fil expected us to drive 200 miles to drop off the forms and he would look them over and get back to us when he's ready. Not to go into the history with them once again but they are in financial ruin and the mil has dementia father in law has diabetes, is on blood thinner and had a mini stroke at a store and was in hospital and rehab care for three weeks . police told my husband they are at the house everyday sometimes 2-3 times. APS told us they will not do anything because inlaws have civil rights. My husband has said we are done with them and will refuse calls from police expecting us to go 200 miles to fix things. He's had it. I don't blame him. Enough is enough.
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Should have said, CANT handle finances......
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One thing to keep in mind, although a POA is LEGALLY to be used once a person is incompetent there's always that gray area where elders can handle finances, meds etc but are still legally competent. My folks are in this middle ground. Dad is not capable of the smallest task, bills banking etc, and Mom is overwhelmed with the slightest bit of paperwork. I have a broad POA, thank god, and have been taking care of bills, banking and finances for over 2 years. Dad thinks mom is doing it.

So in this in between period I'm keeping things afloat and will have the authority to place them in care or get in home help once they are legally incompetent.
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Oh, and one more thing. Social Security will not recognize POA. They have their own form. It would be wise to take care of that at the same time.
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The POA benefits your dad. It allows someone to take control of his finances should he become incapacitated. You will be able to get information on anything, and act in your dad's best interest. So in the long run it benefits you so a court proceeding is not necessary, sometimes it happens anyway, should he become unable to manage his own affairs. Just keep excellent records and be accountable for every dime.
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If documents haven't been drafted by an attorney, you don't really have a guaranty that they'll provide the authority you want. I was just reviewing my father's DPOA tonight - it's a lot broader than I remember. I can do anything he can do (well, except be a man and that's not something I really want to do) - sell, mortgage, manage finances including investments - everything.

There's even a clause appointing me Guardian and Conservator if any proceedings should be instituted. How that might mesh or conflict with any court action should the occasion arise is something that would have to be determined, but hopefully that situation will never occur.

As I recall there were a lot of issues with your in-laws finances. You could ask yourself after studying the POA whether it grants you the authority you need and want to handle whatever issues are of concern regarding their care. My father's allow me to apply for Medicaid on his behalf; it's also broad enough that I could sign and apply for VA benefits.
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Well, I have financial Power of Attorney for my Dad. I would be able to pay his bills from his checking account... manage his savings.... sell his house. Without it, my hands would be tied, and if Dad was unable to manage on his own, then the local Court would appoint someone to be Dad's Power of Attorney, be it me or another relative, or even an attorney, and all that takes time and money.

May I ask who drew up the medical POA and the financial POA? Since your husband had to line up a witness [most States require two witnesses] and a Notary cannot be a witness as he/she cannot notarized his/her own signature.
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