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Do I also have to send in a incident report to agency?

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I wish I could just say, with complete confidence: "it is vital that you file a report detailing exactly how your client came to fall and what the consequences were for her and you and how you went about recovering her from the fall. This is the only way that risks can be highlighted and prevented in future; and for that reason the appropriate response to the report would be praise from your employers and gratitude from the aging care community in general for your constructive input."

However. The quality of care depends absolutely on the quality of management and leadership in a given setting. What is this centre like, what are the family like? You MUST still record and ideally report accurate details, but if you're concerned that you don't have good line managers, or that the family is both stupid and litigious, you may want to get advice or back-up in place first.
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PS Sorry, I did not address your question. They shouldn't do anything to you, unless there were injuries involved and you did not report the incident. Based on what you said, I don't think you need to worry. I stand by my advice, though, for the future.
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I agree with some who say yes, file an accident report. For your own protection, I recommend keeping a copy of reports and taking pictures of any unusual occurrence. If you have to fill out a log at the end of your shift, always make note of such things and sign it. Speaking from a daughter's point of view, I always wanted to know what was happening with my mom. I visited her every day, and I was aware of any bruises, etc. Of course, my mom was so frail and thin toward the end, I realized that just sliding from a chair would have bruised her tail bone. In your position, remember to report everything, so that family will know; and, keep copies and pictures to protect yourself. I thank you, on behalf of the patients and their families, for being conscientious in such a very difficult job. Hope my advice helps.
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Actually yes you should always complete and incident report explaining what happened when it happened where is happened and what was happening at the time - did the door bell ring for example or you turned to answer the phone or whatever. Sometimes there is a link between episodes/incidents and what is going on at the time. A woman in a care home I visited used to scream and cower every time I visited. By geolocating the incident ie what where when what else was going on atthe time it utrned out this woman wasn't scared of strangers but of the hoover which whined and when it was turned off because someone had come in she thought that it was a doodlebug (she had experienced them as a child in London during the blitz) Now they hoover when she is in bed - problem solved. Simple but it had taken them 4 years to establish that!
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My mum is in hospital as I write and she has leaned forward and also slid from her chair while in hospital. After they realised I was not just going to sit back and watch this happen (I stayed with her and she still fell while I was in the rest room) they brought crash mats and put them under her chair and round her bed- I have to say that they are incredibly difficult to walk on being made of memory foam but hell she couldnt hurt herself from falling unless she hit her head on the way down.
Accidents do indeed happen and even you have to go to the lavatory now and again so it would be harsh for them to make you responsible
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The bad thing is, you cannot restrain people even if leaning and falling out of a chair happens all the time. An incident report has to be made out, family called and my daughter says that can take a half hour out of her day.
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Because of a brain injury, my sister will fall if she leans forward. I'm guessing the 'ld' is for 'leaned.' My sister was in a skilled nursing that had strict protocol that incident be told to nurse in charge who called me. Fortunately my sister was not injured, but needed assistance to get back up. We discussed and made a change to my sister's environment but no one was 'blamed' or punished.
In my opinion, I would urge any caregiver to be open and report every incident. That puts it onto management to report to family and takes that burden off the caregiver.
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First and foremost, when the client slid out of the chair, what was the result. Was he injured? Did you take him to the ER to be checked for internal injuries? Were you alone with the client at the time?

Did you notify, immediately, the client's family - your employer - or anyone? Yes, I would think a report would need to be made just to protect you and the center. Later on there might be bruises or soreness or something that would need to be explained.

What will they do to you? Nothing if you were following all protocol. Accidents happen.
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Thank you!
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I have a guess as to "ld" and I think it is a typo, for "slid" as in, a client slid out of her chair.
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OK, I am really not trying to be snotty but I did a google search to try to figure out what ld means and got everything from the Lincoln-Douglas Debate to a loading dock. Or is it ID? So, can someone help me?
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Do u work for an agency? What r their rules? I would say an incident report needs to be filed and family told. This is how NHs are run. Accidents happen but family can ask for a different aide. What the agency will do is what the rules r. Don't want tobe too harsh here but as an employee u should have been given a manual.
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