Follow
Share

My son had to retire early because of his high pressure job's stress factor. His diabetes was out of control and this lead to the fore mentioned issues leading to the bi-pass surgery. He is not able to care for himself without assistance. His surgery is about three weeks old now.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
Why do I keep getting notices as if there is a new answer to this question, but there isn't any new answers? This happens over and over on many questions. What's up with this site?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I'm surprised he was released home with all his problems and no one to care for him. Didn't the Social Worker set him up for homecare. Call the hospital that released him and ask to talk to a social worker. Just being legally blind he should be able to get some help.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Major heart surgery often causes depression in it's patients. Many who go through this say the depression is worse than any other part of the process. Your son is going from an active job to not being employed at all. These are some very big life changes to adapt to. Be prepared that he might show signs of depression. Learn what they are and be observant for his sake. Should he have major depression this could influence who he needs to have around him to help him through this phase of his life. He will have to be willing to take any medicines on time and at the right doses.

You can buy a medication dispenser ($200.00+) where you load many days' worth of medicines in separate compartments for each time of day. An alarm goes off each time medicine is due. Only the compartment of the correct medicine due opens up and can be turned over and the pills dumped right into your hand. Very easy for a legally blind person to feel the open compartment and take their correct medicine with. The dispenser is round in shape. It's well worth it's cost if other methods don't work out.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Mitch, did you son need assistance before his by-pass surgery? Normally people, especially someone as young as your son, usually bounce back quickly from such surgery. Were there complications? Or is his diabetes still out of control because of how he is eating, etc?
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Since you don't mention a financial situation I'll assume money is no problem. 1st choice is to leave him where he is familiar since he's legally blind. That means calling an agency that you've found good reports on and describing his situation and needs. The agency will tell you what level of care and nursing he needs and the cost. It'll be expensive. Start with asking his Drs. for good referrals.
2nd choice is to place him somewhere until he's fully recovered from the surgery. Again, you find a facility that has a good reputation and very few nosocomial infections (infections acquired at the facility). Where is he regarding being on an antibiotic? He needs a good probiotic to repopulate his gastrointestinal tract to prevent further infections. Infections like C. diff that can be deadly are rampant at some facilities so ask the right questions and look at reviews of the facility online. When you talk to the admitting person of the facility, you go over his needs and that person can tell you what level of care he needs and the estimate of cost.

Then you can consider how much care, if any, he may need once recovered from the surgery and adapting to home life.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Where is he living and what is the financial situation for him? Are you taking care of him? There are many in home health services available depending on what his needs are. He's too young for Medicare. If he needs to be in a care facility he may qualify for Medicaid if there are no funds.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.