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I love to cook but my husband, who loved to eat, hardly eats what I make now. I am at a loss as to give him the proper nutrition. He always loved breakfast but he is down to 1/3 of what he use to eat and I try to give dinner at lunch time since he won't eat at dinner time in the afternoon. I like to give him protein, a starch and veggies. Have the starch and veggies figured out but the protein is a challenge. If I serve him a steak he usually has about 5 small bites of it and prefers the veggies and mashed potatoes or rice. He eats pork, lamb the same way. Likes pasta and a small piece of Italian sausage but dislikes fish, pizza, burgers. Loves fruit but he was 140 lbs. two months ago and is now down to 108. If he keeps but the weight lost, he will be a stick. He can't tolerate milk and dairy products so Ensure is out. Any ideas anyone?

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How about you just mince the meats. With bolognese sauce. Make a batch and freeze some in little pots (the size you think he MAY be able to eat. Minced chicken with a nice sauce.

Good luck
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These days, there are several protein powders that aren't dairy. Pea protein, hemp hearts, etc. Just go to someplace like Whole Foods to find them. But keep in mind Americans are unnecessarily obsessed with protein, which isn't helping our overall health. Our greatest growth period as humans is when we're nursing babies and mother's milk only as 5-6% protein. So don't feel that's necessary. I'd focus more on calories and fat. Add some peanut butter or other nut butter for a real positive boost. Good luck!
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don't forget the protein powder in the shakes! I suppose that would have to be soy protein and not whey protein?
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Thanks to everyone who had some good ideas. I am going to try milkshakes made with almond milk and non-dairy ice cream. Fortunately, he doesn't have any swallowing issues. Guess I just have to face the fact that this is a progression of his disease and not worry about the nutrition but feed him what he likes.
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This certainly wouldn't work if your husband has any swallowing issues, but my mom loved mixed nuts, which are high calorie with lots of good fats. She also loved those little Stouffers cups of mac and cheese (in the freezer section). Those are soft and easy to eat. I'd make your husband milkshakes with soy or almond milk and some non-dairy ice cream (made from coconut milk or soy milk). You could even add protein powder to that, if a milkshake is something he'd drink.

The idea of the swallow study is good. My dad had that after his stroke. He was supposed to eat thickened food but hated it, so we did the best we could.

Also, my cousin, who is a nurse, said that as we near the end of our lives, our taste for meat is the first one to go, while our taste for sweets is the last one. So you'll find hospice patients who want less and less meat or savory foods and more and more sugary foods. Good luck, I know it's hard to accept when your loved one isn't eating.
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My wife is starting to leave food that she would normally finish. Mostly meats but yesterday it was her eggs. I am going to try fish. That is big with her.And it does not require as much chewing. She has also started a new med which is making her seem very weak and slow. She is now sleeping more and odd hours than before. I am suspecting the meds but it could just be the progression of the disease.
She likes her fruit, mangoes & bananas. She will get more of the soft fruits now.
I am going to speak to the PCP next week about her new meds and loss of appetite.
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How well can he handle the steak, and other meats? Does he cough or choke?

I'm wondering the same thing as Karsten. Meats are much harder to swallow if someone has dysphagia, a swallowing disorder. Fibrous foods can cause someone to cough and choke. Sometimes those meats get pocketed in the mouth.

He could just be losing his appetite, but he could have a swallowing disorder. If he has a PCP, I would ask about a videoscopic swallow test, performed and monitored by a speech pathologist.

It's easy, not painful. His swallowing is reflected in a type of x-ray machine, while he eats samples of foods (such as crackers) and liquids. The speech pathologist can see whether or not food is going into his lungs (aspiration).

If so, his diet would be changed, perhaps to what's called mechanical soft, or pureed foods, and he would be switched to thickened liquids.

Either way, I think it would be a good idea for someone to examine him for any other issues that could affect his appetite, especially if he's pocketing food.

It also could be that he's just reached a stage where he doesn't want as much food as he used to eat.

I also had an experience similar to Pam's. Meals were generally 2 hours. I just took a gardening magazine with me and read while he finished eating.
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with Alzheimers people often develop problems swallowing which effects their desire to eat. Has he had any kind of swallow study done? The fact that he eats more soft foods might indicate something.
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This is out there,, but maybe he just needs more time to eat? My dad loved to eat, but towards the end he could take an hour to eat 1/2 a sandwitch and a cup of soup. One of my friends and I used to take him to a local diner, and we could be there 2 hours! We would visit, and he would munch his way along,,,  At this point I agree it's about the calories,, so give him what he may eat and just try to offer more nutrition as he will do it.. like lots of snacks.
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With dementia, their tastes change. Feed him whatever he'll eat. Focus on adequate protein and calories & Multivitamin.
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How long has it been since he had a visit with his doctor? Sometimes Alzheimer’s sufferers have symptoms or issues they can’t find the words to express. My mom had Alzheimer’s and she ate like a bird as well. We celebrated every pound gained or not lost. Honestly, I brought her fast food and junk food just to get her to eat. Maybe he would eat salads? You could slip some chicken, ham or beef in with the salad. Maybe his doctor could suggest a dietitian to help you find things he would eat.
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